Low or High Pass Filter with bass overdrive/distortion?

Discussion in 'Effects [BG]' started by jacoby75, Jan 26, 2018.


  1. jacoby75

    jacoby75 Supporting Member

    Mar 11, 2010
    Coldwater, MI
    Endorsing Artist: Mike Lull Custom Guitars, DR Strings
    Hey guys,

    I'm still trying to work out a way to get rid of some "buzziness" when using drives and distortions direct (or to the amp for that matter). I have read somewhere around here that some users, @JimmyM , for example, use filters on their tone. I've been trying to read up online about which I would use. A low or high pass to cut the buzzy highs, but my brain no worky so well. I has the dumbs. I just don't get it. Some low pass filter pedals that I've seen are more like resonant auto-wah pedals or envelope filters. That's not what I'm looking for.

    Can anyone guide me towards which type of filter I'd want, and maybe even suggest where I might find such a thing? The high pass filters on ebay look nothing like a pedal or anything that I could use. I just don't know what I'm looking for.

    Thanks
     
  2. monsterthompson

    monsterthompson The Eighth Note Wonder Of The World Supporting Member

    Nov 25, 2008
    Hollywood
    You probably want a low pass. That means only frequencies under a threshold are allowed to pass. A high pass is the opposite, only letting frequencies higher than a set threshold pass.

    Various ones out there. Broughton is popular.
     
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  3. JimmyM

    JimmyM

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Yamaha, Ampeg, Line 6, EMG
    A low pass filter is for cutting unwanted highs. A high pass filter is for cutting unwanted lows. Sounds counterintuitive, but the filters are letting the frequencies you want pass through the chain while blocking the frequencies you don't want.
     
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  4. jacoby75

    jacoby75 Supporting Member

    Mar 11, 2010
    Coldwater, MI
    Endorsing Artist: Mike Lull Custom Guitars, DR Strings
    Thank you.
     
    JimmyM likes this.
  5. JimmyM

    JimmyM

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Yamaha, Ampeg, Line 6, EMG
    Forgot to mention that I use the separate Broughton units because I double on upright and don't want to low pass the upright, but they make a combination high pass/low pass that's excellent as well. Listed on this page:

    Home
     
  6. jacoby75

    jacoby75 Supporting Member

    Mar 11, 2010
    Coldwater, MI
    Endorsing Artist: Mike Lull Custom Guitars, DR Strings
    Thanks, Jimmy. Any chance you know where a fella could find some audio or video clips of a low pass filter in action while using overdrive/distortion on bass? I've only found one video of the HPF/LPF, which is just a clean bass.
     
  7. JimmyM

    JimmyM

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Yamaha, Ampeg, Line 6, EMG
    Not off the top of my head.
     
  8. Beheroth

    Beheroth

    Aug 26, 2016
    any clip of a RAT, the tone control is just a basic LPF at the end of the circuit
     
  9. Mosfed

    Mosfed

    Apr 21, 2013
    Washington DC
    Partner - CCP Pedals
    I find that both help distortion a great deal. A LPF can really help with buzzy highs and too much treble content, and a HPF can really help with uncontrolled lows and frequencies that seem to muddy everything after distortion. I would get a Broughton HPF/LPF and call it a day.
     
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  10. Seanbassplayer

    Seanbassplayer

    Oct 14, 2016
    *This*
     
  11. jacoby75

    jacoby75 Supporting Member

    Mar 11, 2010
    Coldwater, MI
    Endorsing Artist: Mike Lull Custom Guitars, DR Strings
    Thank you. So if I did, would it go before or after the distortion?
     
  12. Seanbassplayer

    Seanbassplayer

    Oct 14, 2016
    After
     
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  13. Mosfed

    Mosfed

    Apr 21, 2013
    Washington DC
    Partner - CCP Pedals
    After - end of chain.
     
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  14. jacoby75

    jacoby75 Supporting Member

    Mar 11, 2010
    Coldwater, MI
    Endorsing Artist: Mike Lull Custom Guitars, DR Strings
    Does a low pass filter differ much from the speaker sim switch on the vt bass di? Because I use that and it helps, but I still feels like I need more control of the frequencies I’m cutting out. Maybe a graphic eq pedal might help too?.
     
  15. jacoby75

    jacoby75 Supporting Member

    Mar 11, 2010
    Coldwater, MI
    Endorsing Artist: Mike Lull Custom Guitars, DR Strings
    Or perhaps the vt bass in conjunction with the low pass would give me the control I’m looking for.
     
  16. JimmyM

    JimmyM

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Yamaha, Ampeg, Line 6, EMG
    The VT series has fixed low and high pass filters built into it that simulate the sound of typical tweeterless Ampeg cabs. The frequencies are well chosen but they can't be adjusted.
     
  17. baxter_x

    baxter_x

    Nov 27, 2013
    EU
    I bought a Broughton HPF a several months ago. It's one of the best devices I've ever bought. My cabs thank me so much too! Also, when engaging distortion on my Mesa Titan, I don't see the speakers jumping off anymore.
     
  18. monsterthompson

    monsterthompson The Eighth Note Wonder Of The World Supporting Member

    Nov 25, 2008
    Hollywood
    Speaker sims and pass filters are closely related, as a cabinet is a mechanical pass filter (as opposed to an electrical one). The difference is that there are resonant peaks at the cutoff frequencies. For example, if you looked at the cab sim wave from, you'd see a the pass filter at say 50 Hz, along with a bump in the frequencies just above it, which would then dip down close to flat at slightly higher frequencies. Additionally, you'll get boosts and dips at various frequencies depending on the cab you are trying to emulate with the sim. HPF and LPF will just give you a steep frequency cut at the cutoff frequency selected, which is often 4-pole (48 dB per octave), I believe.

    Example of a cab sim range of adjustments:
    condor-marshall.png
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2018
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  19. monsterthompson

    monsterthompson The Eighth Note Wonder Of The World Supporting Member

    Nov 25, 2008
    Hollywood
    The benefit of a high pass filter (including a cab sim) is that it filters out the inaudible low frequency string movement which is detected by your pickup and passed through to the amplifier. If you were to pinch a string and slowly wiggle it, that movement would go through to your amp, and your speaker would move, though it would be at too low of a frequency to be audible. Still, that information is being transmitted, and using your amp's watts and straining your woofer.

    Many modern amps have some degree of pass filtering built in their circuits even if it isn't advertised as such.
     
  20. jacoby75

    jacoby75 Supporting Member

    Mar 11, 2010
    Coldwater, MI
    Endorsing Artist: Mike Lull Custom Guitars, DR Strings
    That’s helpful to know. Thanks.
     
    monsterthompson likes this.
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    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
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