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Mic for live sound

Discussion in 'Live Sound [BG]' started by Mike151, Mar 12, 2009.


  1. Mike151

    Mike151

    Dec 22, 2008
    Sherman Texas
    We are building up a really nice PC system and I'm wanting to mic my cabinet for live shows. We play Classic rock and I have a pretty agressive setup. SWR 750X amp with a 2-10 and a 1-15 cabinet. I'm looking for recommendations/suggestions for a good mic so I can run through the PA also.
    Lets hear what you guys use or maybe what your GAS item would be for this.
     
  2. doktorfeelgood

    doktorfeelgood layin' it down like pavement Supporting Member

  3. jtrow

    jtrow

    Mar 1, 2009
    Mid America
    I use, and love, the AKG D 112 Kick Drum microphone. It normally sells for $200, but I believe it's worth every penny.
     
  4. jtc_hunter

    jtc_hunter

    Feb 16, 2007
    Shure SM57, they go for about $100. Get a good quality 30'+ cord. If your SWR has a decent DI out, try that first. My GK 700rbII's DI sounds great. I have done it w/ the DI and I have mic'd. To the crowd there is very little difference, so I just use my DI off the amp. One less mic to setup.
     
  5. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    I like most decent mics on bass. I find micing a bass extremely easy to get a great sound. But it works best IMHO if you get a good fullrange mic that's relatively flat in its response. So that's why I don't dig kick mics. They can sound good but they can also boost the same freqs as the kick and cause you to get lost in a mix.

    Had great luck with SM-58 and 57, Sennheiser 421, EV RE-20, Beyer M88, but I'm really digging the Heil PR 40. Huge freq range and almost dead flat. A bit expensive at $325 but it sounds amazing.
     
  6. i am fortunate to be using brand new Heil mics... you guys should look em up and try them... your world will change that is a fact!!!
     
  7. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    Ya, Heil just came out with a new vocal mic called the PR 35 that's badass and is dead flat from 40 hz on up, and it's only $225, I think. I sung through one on a gig recently and it's amazing...it's actually too good for my voice. That would make an excellent bass mic, too.
     
  8. TimmyP

    TimmyP

    Nov 4, 2003
    Indianapolis, IN
    Audix D4 - used for $85 to $125 (depending on physical condition and luck), or a Heil PR40. I'd also use a DI, as you'll get deeper low end than you'll get with a mic on a bass cab. I recommend the Radial Pro48.
     
  9. Mike151

    Mike151

    Dec 22, 2008
    Sherman Texas
    We got a very nice set of subs for our PA this week and I tried direct. That will do nicely now! Those Yorkville ls808 subs are awesome as you can feel the drums in your chest.
    The issue I'm having now is I'm not used to having so many other lows in my neighborhood and I had to play with my mids and trebel cranked up a bit last night to get my usual definition. Maybe my ears just have to get used to me not being the only Low Man. Comments on that? :meh:
     
  10. TimmyP

    TimmyP

    Nov 4, 2003
    Indianapolis, IN
    Make sure that your cabinet is pointed at your head, otherwise you'll be projecting a lot of unwanted "twank" into the crowd.

    To get the definition you want, make your first boost somewhere between 500Hz and 1kHz.
     
  11. Mike151

    Mike151

    Dec 22, 2008
    Sherman Texas
    I just have 3 knobs. Bass mid trebel. Can you translate the eq settings for that? I usually run almost completely flat.
     
  12. iriegnome

    iriegnome Bassstar style Supporting Member

    Nov 23, 2001
    Kenosha, WI 53140
    I have a Bass 750. I have run line out to the PA all over the country with it and it is quiet and perfectly clean. NEVER a single problem. Festivals we play are always trying to put a DI or Mic on my amp and are always supprised at the clarity of my Direct out.
    Now, if you are running the direct and need a second channel for ambient sound, Shure Beta 52 or the Audix D-6 are really good mic's. I don't care for the AKG D112 (personally), but they are really popular.
    Live sound wise though, most basses are run direct, either through a DI or through your line out on the SWR.
    DI choices are BSS, Countryman, Radial, and Reddi
     
  13. Johnny Crab

    Johnny Crab ACME,QSC,Fame/Hondo/Greco/HELIX user & BOSE Abuser Gold Supporting Member

    Feb 11, 2004
    South Texas
    +1 to direct.
    +1 to the Sennheiser MD421.

    Use the direct to get the bass "umph" and low end power.

    In your case, I would mic the 10's fairly close midway between the dust cap and the outer edge of the cone(the 10's push your mids & highs more than the 15...clarity and definition). Really try to get the 10's pointed towards ear level if possible as they can be beamy(too clanky in the audience and can't hear yourself good on stage, been there done that).

    The mic is there to get what YOU make YOUR bass sound like through your speakers. Whether you have distortion, clean, highs, mid-boost, or a mix of that....you WANT what you hear on stage at your cabinet to be available to the FOH person to mix with the powerful body of the direct feed. The Sennheiser is very good at doing that.

    The soundperson MUST work at balancing the drum lows, guitar lows(if there are any), and your lows to prevent a mushy roar. Practice, reading up on live sound mixing, learning from other sound-folks, and experience are the keys to getting there.
     
  14. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    That's exactly what it is. Subs are omnidirectional so you'll get way more output onstage where you're at from the subs than the other PA cabs. A better strategy IMHO is to reduce the low end on your amp and don't boost the mids and highs. That way you don't get all peaky and irritating with the mids and highs. But as long as you're getting a sound you like, it's fine to boost the mids and highs.
     
  15. TimmyP

    TimmyP

    Nov 4, 2003
    Indianapolis, IN
    Good advice there. Also note that there may be spots on the stage where the sub spill is extra hot, and spots where there's hardly anything. Having heavy low end from your bass rig can alter where these spots are.
     

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