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Multiband compressor?

Discussion in 'Effects [BG]' started by SwamiRob, Aug 11, 2012.


  1. I'm looking for something to really even out the low end of my bass, I've been using Circle K balanced tension strings for the last few months which seem to have really helped, but still getting a big amount of dub from my E and everything getting noticeably thinner on the D and G, sound and output wise much much better however and couldn't recommend them any more highly.

    Only thing I can really think of now is compression, but it's something I'm not really a massive fan of, so was wondering if there was any pedal/rack that doesn't cost several grand that can do a job to even out bottom end a bit? Ideally I just want something that I can mess about compressing the low end over several areas, but I imagine that to do that I either need to spend the several grand on some fancy rack stuff or put a computer inbetween my bass and amp to do a similar job.
     
  2. BassMonstrum

    BassMonstrum

    Mar 7, 2008
    Two pedals spring to mind; Ashdown Multiband Compressor and EBS Multicomp. I have the latter and like it.
     
  3. pantherairsoft

    pantherairsoft

    Apr 22, 2009
    Derby, UK
    TC Nova Dynamics is my weapon of choice!
     
  4. +1 on the MultiComp!

    J!
     
  5. ryansalmond

    ryansalmond

    Nov 21, 2007
    Canada
    FEA Dual-Band. You will thank me later.
     
  6. JEBassman

    JEBassman Supporting Member

    Jun 25, 2008
    Connecticut
    Have you tried changing your EQ settings? Depending on your gear and the settings you use, it may be possible to either eliminate or at least decrease this imbalance you're experiencing.

    Adding a compressor can have benefits too; I would recommend studying the EQ first before buying a pedal.

    Best of luck. :)
     
  7. eddododo

    eddododo Supporting Member

    Apr 7, 2010
    A simple HPF device might be the ticket
     
  8. I have played around with the EQ a little to try and sort it out, but I only have a fairly limited scope to mess around with it cos I'm only working with a 3 band with a 3 way switchable contour. Don't really wanna lose any low frequncies that are causing the problem either, don't have my rig setup with that much bass coming out, just doesn't seem that even basswise overall, tried messing with pickup heights too but that just results in having louder treble side and doesn't really get rid of the bass response problem. Do the Ashdown and EBS pedals manage to compress the low end without having much effect on the audible side of things, I'm really after something that effects the sound of my rig as little as possible, Ideally it'd be nice if I could EQ each string and avoid compression altogether.
     
  9. +1 total agreement. Hard to get though
     
  10. Duke21

    Duke21

    Nov 14, 2010
    Narvik, Norway
    I've also have the EBS multicomp, and I like it!
     
  11. LSMFT6

    LSMFT6 We brake for nobody Supporting Member

    Aug 16, 2006
    California
    None
    Daring Audio Phat Beam
     
  12. Explorer

    Explorer

    Jul 4, 2010
    wut?

    If you're having a problem, but don't want to eliminate the cause of the problem...

    ----

    If it was me, though, the first thing I'd look at is setting an amp completely flat, and then seeing if the bass outputs flat throughout its range and across its strings. If the high strings are weak compared to the low strings, even playing the same pitches, I'd look at the pickup height. The lower strings move a bigger mass through that magnetic field, and will affect it more. Does your low E string sound louder at the 10th fret than your open D string?

    ----

    The other possibility which crosses my mind is that you're generating some kind of noise which you can't hear, but which your speaker is attempting to reproduce. That's what gear like the Thumpinator can help with, cleaning up the trash so it doesn't affect your amp.

    If you're only open to compression solutions to your frequency problem, though, the Zoom B3 also contains a dual compressor.

    ----

    Anytime someone is having a problem though, and insists at the start that a particular group of solutions won't even be considered, it calls into question the desire to solve the problem. That might just be my way of thinking, though.
     
  13. I just don't wanna lose lows as a solution that was all, I wanna make my D and G fatter, and not makie the overall sound thinner apart from maybe taming the E a tad. The balanced tension strings have definitely helped, but only so much. I know there's only so much you can do to sort this kinda thing out without everything becoming horribly compressed unless your in the studio with a fully adjustable mutltiband or whatever, and that's still very obvious if you have to overuse it.

    Investing in a decent 7 band or so EQ pedal so I can get a bit more accuracy might help contain the E string a little as it is a little overwhelming (and a little more brightness wouldn't go a miss either which that might help with) but my main worry is how underwhelming the D/G are. Taking out some of the E's fundamental would help balance things a little, but they seem inherently much thinner sounding and a bit of compression seems the only way to go. My pickup balance is already very much in favour of the treble strings so not much to do there either.
     
  14. iplaymetal

    iplaymetal

    Jun 14, 2010
    You should do what the guy said above, set all knobs to noon, and check for imbalance. Next I would equalize by cutting what I don't like and leaving what I do like. Remember it's always better to cut what you don't like and leave what you do like because you get greater control over your equalization and you can avoid a muddy sound.

    I suspect that the underlying issue is that to achieve this super fat tone you are boosting the hell out of the lower frequencies, which is, in turn, giving them a louder sound.

    Thin D/G sounds like it could be that your mids are scooped out... Overall, if you're not happy with your current sound, scrap the eq settings and start again!
     
  15. caeman

    caeman The Root Master

    Sep 17, 2008
    Ohio
    This. You might be having an infrasonic rumble problem down that low. If you run a high-pass filter at 35Hz ([sx] Micro Thumpinator, Fdeck HPF-Pre), it will eliminate the needless rumble and clear up the low end quite a bit.
     
  16. EskimoBassist

    EskimoBassist

    Nov 2, 2007
    Leeds, UK
    Lurve my EBS. Super simple and great sounding.
     
  17. eddododo

    eddododo Supporting Member

    Apr 7, 2010
    Glad someone agreed..
    If you try the fdeck HPF I suggest it in your fx loop
     
  18. If you just want your low end tamed, and don't really need to compress your high's - a multi is not needed. If all I was looking to do is limit my low end, I would use the Aguilar TLC.

    However - I've found the TC Electronic compressor in my RH750 to be amazing. But if your not up for buying a new head, I'd go Aguilar TLC... or the TC Nova if you can find one. Amazing multi-band compressor.
     
  19. caeman

    caeman The Root Master

    Sep 17, 2008
    Ohio
    I agree with the HPF because my Gretsch G2202 is rumbly on the E string. It easily clips my amp and any overdrive pedal I try to use with it. That problem was solved with a simple high-pass filter. It cleaned up and allowed my E string to sound nice, rather than like mud.

    If the OP is wanting a compressor, and looking to control that low rumble at the same time, the Guyatone ST2 is quiet, inexpensive and it tames the low end in a good way.
     
  20. Dude I would try dropping the height of the pickups at the E string and possibly bringing up the height of the G side.

    It has worked for me and many others as a cheap, quick and effective way of balancing out volume and sometimes clarity imbalances between strings.

    Its easy enough to try and if it doesnt work its easy to re adjust back. Then possibly look at compression etc

    Also possibly consider the room. I have had my rig sounding amazing in the studio and have the low end (particularly B/E) turn to flubber in a crappy rehearsal room

    Just my 2c
     

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