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p-bass and baddass II

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by xshawnxearthx, Jul 12, 2005.


  1. xshawnxearthx

    xshawnxearthx

    Aug 23, 2004
    new jersey
    so, hearing all this talk of the bad ass bridge and how it adds sustain and note clarity and all this other stuff.

    my question is, does it take up more room on the bass then a standard bridge? it looks a lot bigger.


    anyone put these on their mia p-bass? how did you like it?
     
  2. tplyons

    tplyons

    Apr 6, 2003
    Madison, NJ
    Yes, it does take up more room, and the neck will usually need to be shimmed because of the thicker baseplate of the bridge, but I love it. Had it on my '78 for a while, and took it off only because the color didn't match the rest of my hardware. I plan to have one reinstalled quite soon actually.
     
  3. I was afraid of that. Ugh. So much for no-mod replacement. Mine should be in in a bout a week, I'll see then.

    Double UGH. :mad:
     
  4. xshawnxearthx

    xshawnxearthx

    Aug 23, 2004
    new jersey
    ugh, i triple that no mod bs. i want to try one out, because this american bridge bites.
     
  5. Shimming the neck is a no brainer...long before TB and long before I knew anything really about basses, I discovered that a thin piece of material, like a business card, can do wonders for getting your neck angle just right.

    Do a search on shims, or shimming, there's HEAPS of stuff here on how to do it...
     
    B-Bake likes this.
  6. tplyons

    tplyons

    Apr 6, 2003
    Madison, NJ
    That's less of a mod than the bridge swap is. Dude, shimming the neck is standard practice when it comes to doing setups.
     
  7. Jonki

    Jonki I will not slap my Bee!

    Oct 14, 2003
    Arendal, Norway
    if you wanna check out how big it is, check out steve harris' bass.
    its a p-bass with badass II bridge
     
  8. BassyBill

    BassyBill The smooth moderator... Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 12, 2005
    West Midlands UK
    I'm with pilbara and tplyons on this, shimming the neck is dead simple on a bolt-on neck bass. Standard part of a setup, no need for an "ugh".
     
  9. Guys, I kow full well how to shim necks, it's just I have this one dialed in just right, and tho it's contradictory to complain about one end and not the other, I just don't want the hassle.

    I usually do a full-size tapered shim out of real wood. I just don't like the idea of there being any gaps at any points of contact that can rob coupling and sustain is all.

    So, grrrr. Again. :D
     
  10. basslag13

    basslag13

    Apr 16, 2005

    i didn't shim my neck when i put it on my jazz bazz. It suppose to be a direct replacement bridge for fender basses.
     
  11. tplyons

    tplyons

    Apr 6, 2003
    Madison, NJ
    It's not NECESSARY in many cases, however, in order to dial in a low action sometimes it does become a necessity.
     
    B-Bake likes this.
  12. BassyBill

    BassyBill The smooth moderator... Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 12, 2005
    West Midlands UK
    Hey, MR, you said "ugh" first, and now you're saying "grrr". You can't change your tune mid-thread just to make your point! :D

    I just use cardboard for shimming necks and I've found it works well. I think under the sort of pressure you get in a neck joint, cardboard (at this sort of thickness) will compress down well, until it becomes as rigid as wood. What do you think?

    Also non-contact area must be pretty much non-existent, again because of compression squeezing the shim to fit. If you think about a flat neck heel going in a flat neck socket with a tapered shim at one end, there has to be some non-contact area there as well (straight surface meeting a surface with a "kink" in it at the edge of the shim). Or do you actually make a shim that covers the whole of the joint. Sounds unlikely to me, it'd be too thick at the one end, surely? Just my .02, and my insatiable curiosity!
     
  13. basslag13

    basslag13

    Apr 16, 2005
    oh well i guess that makes sense. I actually had to raise the action when i put it on. :meh:
     
  14. No, I use a decent piece of veneer (often @ .045 thick, if paper backed), and ever so slightly feather sand to one end with a block and real fine sandpaper...it covers *most* of the area (about 2/3rds...) of the pocket. I know that's extremely anal of me, but I think it matters. :D

    Oh, and grrrrugh! :D
     
  15. Ok, it's on the bass, and I'm gonna notch the saddles after work today.

    Question:

    This notch I presume is angled, and that the front edge of the saddle is the break point in reference to scale length and note production, so do I file UP TO the front edge of the saddle, but not compromise the flatness of that edge?

    I imagine that would be just fine, with an angled notch simply for the string to lie in, to keep it from moving laterally, yes???
     
  16. So, no thoughts on this one then?!?
     
  17. Jimmy P.

    Jimmy P.

    Apr 5, 2005
    Tokyo, Japan
    I too am currently installing a Quan BA 2 bridge and am wondering about the shape and location of the saddle notches. I may just do what others have suggested and install it without any grooves initially, and see if the strings shift on the saddles.
     
  18. Yes!

    If a slight notch doesn't keep the string in place, continue to "file" out the notch with a piece of old string that's the proper gauge for the saddle.
     
  19. Danka shon. You know what they say, ask 1000 times, file once.

    ;)
     
  20. Jimmy P.

    Jimmy P.

    Apr 5, 2005
    Tokyo, Japan