Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by MCBTunes, May 18, 2005.

  1. ok if the root note is at the 2nd fret/ 3rd striong would the pentatonic scale look like

    1) -----------2-4------------------G


    2) -----------2-4----------------------

    Or am I off base? I'm confused about the root deal, because te pentatonic pattern is in #1, but then for # 1 wouldnt the root be F#? where as in #2 the its the same pattern played at the root but the notes are off? My assumption is that the #1 is correct. But?
  2. godoze


    Oct 21, 2002
    a pentatonic scale say starting on "c" on the a string would be as follows :

    c, eb, f,g, Bb,c

    or in tab terms 1,4,1,3,1,3.

    the pattern is the same regardless of position.

    this is for minor pentatonic

    for major pentatonic
    again starting on "c" would be as follows:

    2,4,1,4,1,4 or c,d,e,g,a,c

    again this pattern is the same regardless of position.
  3. sooption 2 would be correct? just without the E string?
  4. godoze


    Oct 21, 2002
    i do not understand that graphic.

    do you know the notes on the fingerboard ?
  5. it would be B,D,G,A,A,B,(F#,G#) <--- B minor pentatonic?


    it is just read left to right on tab form. so fret 2 on A string, fret 5 on A, fret 2 on D, fret 4 on D etc.
  6. godoze


    Oct 21, 2002
    b minor pentatonic is :

  7. well that doesnt follow the pattern though does it?
  8. godoze


    Oct 21, 2002
    what ? that is the pattern for b minor pentatonic.
    b(1) d(4) e(1) f#(3) a(1) b)3)
  9. Intrepid


    Oct 15, 2001
    Well your patterns are obviously incorrect.

    a minor pentatonic
    A C D E G


    It's bad to think in patterns anyways.

    Eb minor pentatonic
    Eb Gb Ab Bb Db

    I'd need a fingerboard in front of me to put that on a tab. I usually picture a keyboard.
  10. godoze


    Oct 21, 2002
    And why is it bad to think in patterns ?
  11. yeah i dont see a problem with patterns.

    DZ, which fret of which string this note on e(1)?
  12. akuma12


    Aug 25, 2003
    Sarasota, FL
    It's so much easier to think in patterns than to think in note names. Yes, it's good to be able to say the individual notes of a chord, like CEGBb, but in the middle of playing, it's much easier to think 2-1-4-2 in terms of fingers. At least in my opinion.
  13. Ok, this is the minor pentatonic pattern. If we move this pattern down to B(second fret 3rd string)

    it would be


    I cant see where i'm going wrong here.
    1,4,1,3,1,3 is that pattern is it not?
  14. godoze


    Oct 21, 2002
    Right on! just remeber that this same pattern for minor pent. applies to any mp scale started on the e and a strings.
  15. burntgorilla


    Jan 24, 2005
    Would it not be

    B,D, E, F#, A, B?

    Edit: It might help if you learn the degrees of the scale, it makes it easier to work out notes.
  16. godoze


    Oct 21, 2002
    yes, that would be b minor pentatonic.

    his graphic is ambiguos because he does not show which fret "1" on the e string is on.
  17. godoze


    Oct 21, 2002
    the scale degrees are as follows :

    minor pent : root, minor 3rd, p4,p5,m7
    major pent : root, M2,M3,p5,M6
    major scale: root,M2,M3,p4,p5,M6,M7
    pure minor : root, M2,m3,p4,p5,m6,m7
    harmonic minor: root, M2,m3,p4,p5,m6,M7
    melodic minor ascending : root, M2,m3,p4,p5,M6,M7
    melodic minor descending : root,m7,m6,p5,p4,m3,M2,root

    After writing all of that i realized that "root" should actually be writtne in this contect as "tonic."
  18. slinkp


    Aug 29, 2003
    brooklyn, NY, USA
    first of all "the pentatonic scale" is ambiguous. I think you're
    talking about minor pentatonic.
    Anyway the answer is neither. Each of your examples makes
    a different mistake. #1 gets the second note wrong, #2 gets the
    last note wrong. B minor pentatonic would look like this:


    And of course there's a million fingerings...
    here's some random riffs...


    or (first finger at 5th fret; second finger at 7th fret)




    I agree with others that thinking in patterns is problematic.
    Why? Because patterns put your focus on the purely mechanical,
    physical, and spatial part of the process, and this puts your concentration in a left-brain mode which is not creative. This distracts you from focusing on what the music actually sounds like. Your hand might "know" patterns, but your brain should not be thinking about them. Your brain should always be hearing sound first and foremost.

    That's how I think about it anyway.

    I once heard a great artist say, "Don't make drawings; instead, watch your hand draw." It's a shift of focus that makes a big difference. Applied to music, I'd say: don't play the instrument; listen to yourself playing the instrument.
  19. godoze


    Oct 21, 2002
    how is the pentatonic scale ambiguos ? I gotta hear this.
  20. godoze


    Oct 21, 2002
    slinkp your scales are not even 5 note scales !