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Prototype Bass

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Frankula, Dec 10, 2018.


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Poll closed Jan 29, 2019.
  1. Build it

    53.6%
  2. Burn it.

    46.4%
  1. Name that Bass.

    I wanted to see how well this would go over, it is a prototype only. I always like the idea of putting the knobs after the bridge, it makes the end of the body have to be longer, thereby helping to eliminate neck dive. Plus I just like the body shape. Let me know in the comments if I should make it or burn it.
    I seem to see a lot of comments suggesting this is a short scale bass. Nothing could be farther from the truth, as I copied the scale from the nut to the bride from an actual 35" five string bass, simply because it was the easiest way to get the only crucial part of the guitar as close to correct as I could make it. Yes, it has a lot of wood south of the bridge, I did this in the hope that it would avert neck dive by making the body larger in proportion to the neck, which seems to be the other issue everyone has with this design. It also seems to have given it the visual illusion of a short scale bass... actual length of the bass is 52 1/2" or 133.35 centimeters.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2018
    Plake, REMBO, Ellery and 16 others like this.
  2. Possibly the best bass for metal.
     
    JIO, instrumentlevel, rocu and 19 others like this.
  3. jackn1202

    jackn1202

    Feb 14, 2018
    Austin, TX
    The only things I’d change are I’d go with only one or two pickups, and not angled. That’s only for my preference.

    Make a four banger and I’d be happy to road test it for ya :woot::smug:
     
  4. Well, it's certain nobody else in town will have one just like it, that's for sure. I like it. It's cool and unique without crossing the boundary into weird or goofy. The body shape, pickup angle and knob placement don't look as out of place with the unusual headstock as they would in a more common style, where the peghead would stand out more. Good job combining features not found on other basses to make one memorable instrument.
     
    Novarocker, HolmeBass and jackn1202 like this.
  5. biguglyman

    biguglyman

    Jul 27, 2017
    Rochester, NY
    I like it...
     
  6. HELLonWHEELS

    HELLonWHEELS Supporting Member

    Jun 13, 2005
    Houston
    I think you're scale is going to be off. The way you have it now, it would be a short scale, may be 31"/30", the B string would be floppy.
     
    jamro217 likes this.
  7. cataract

    cataract Supporting Member

    Feb 14, 2007
    Richmond, VA
    I dig it. Having the knobs behind the bridge also makes it super easy to string up left handed (you’d just have to install a new nut + a strap button on the lower horn as well.)
    Not sure if I’m a fan of the inline tuners, makes the headstock too long for my tastes (at least in seeing this 5 string mock-up.)
    The knob placement and symmetry reminds me a bit of the prototype I recently picked up:
    587F27A5-4C1E-4E26-AF65-9139EC6E1129.
     
  8. abarson

    abarson

    Nov 6, 2003
    Santa Cruz
    The forward bridge, reduced body size, short horns and larger headstock means the player will need to contend with significant and fatal neck dive. That's my objective commentary. I'll keep the subjective to myself.
    I highly suggest reading Hiscock's book on building a guitar to understand the importance of a useful design.
     
    jackn1202, Templar, BOOG and 6 others like this.
  9. I've had a bass with the scale shoved forward in the body with a short horn (longer by far than this) and long scale with five keys on the end of a big head. They haven't altered gravity since then, and though it's an interesting design, I'd have to name it 'Crash Dive' as that's just what it's going to do. This is essentially an L Steinberger shape with keys and the weight and leverage out at the end of the neck. I would have to say 'keep sketching' and pass on this interesting design.
     
    osv, bdplaid and Dadagoboi like this.
  10. Mod7

    Mod7

    Sep 17, 2018
    France
    Nice idea, go for it ! :thumbsup:

    I also prefer 2 pickups only (take off the middle one) and not angled or angled the other way because the closer to the bridge, the more highs you get and it'll be a shame for your low strings.

    I also recommand a serie/parallel switch (push/pull on the tone knob for example) to give you more power :bassist: when switching in serie mode.
     
    jackn1202 likes this.
  11. sikamikanico

    sikamikanico Supporting Member

    Mar 17, 2004
    I kinda like it! Not that I’d want it for myself, but it looks fun! Plus, during the breaks, you can cut bread for your band mates :smug:

    I agree with most comments above, make some refinements. This is just a rendering, right? Maybe make an actual prototype, from cheap materials, see how it hangs and plays...
     
    Frankula likes this.
  12. underwhelmist

    underwhelmist

    Nov 16, 2018
    UK
    Are the tuning keys forward of the headstock on that? Do you have to be a yoga expert to tune it?
     
  13. saabfender

    saabfender Banned

    Jan 10, 2018
    Indianapolis
    I like it all except the pickups should be angled the other way. Love the controls at the end of the bridge. Totally stealing that.

    As far as neck dive, a counterweight of 6 or so ounces in the right lower bout should get you fixed up.
     
    jamro217 and jackn1202 like this.
  14. two fingers

    two fingers Opinionated blowhard. But not mad about it. Gold Supporting Member

    Feb 7, 2005
    Eastern NC USA
    Is that mockup done to scale? It looks pretty short (bridge to nut).

    A few issues I see are.....

    1) The points in the top of the head will likely lead to paint chipping. Look at some Reverb ads for pointy basses. Almost all of them have closeup pics of the points with chips.

    2) If neck dive is an issue, look into the leverage caused by the head being in-line and longer. I would shorten the design by making it a 3+2 head that is as short as possible. Short version, the further out the weight is, the more leverage it has.

    3) Avoid having the knobs near the top of the bridge and right behind it. Some techniques would have one's hand sitting on top of the bridge (including muting using the side of the hand when picking). Behind the bridge could work. But keep them as low as possible.

    Overall a cool and original design.
     
    jackn1202 and HolmeBass like this.
  15. 6-StraangCort

    6-StraangCort

    Oct 16, 2018
    Oldsmar, FL

    What program did you use to design it?

    p.s. I dig the design, I would test out a six string version if you had it. I like the idea with knobs behind the bridge.
     
    Frankula likes this.
  16. nilorius

    nilorius

    Oct 27, 2016
    Riga - Latvia
    It could be fine, just don't understand the need of those pickups angleing.
     
  17. cataract

    cataract Supporting Member

    Feb 14, 2007
    Richmond, VA
    Have you ever turned a key that’s in a car’s ignition switch? Same basic principle.
     
  18. TNCreature

    TNCreature Jinkies! Supporting Member

    Jan 25, 2010
    Philadelphia Burbs
    I like its unique qualities.
    I personally would not enjoy all of the tuning keys on the bottom of the headstock. The saw effect is frightening for its potential damage to others...which I understand would be a selling point to others!
     
    Frankula likes this.
  19. 4dog

    4dog

    Aug 18, 2012
    looks cool..just not a fan of inline tuners...and the sawblade headstock doesnt do anything to help it..just one mans opinion.
     
  20. micguy

    micguy

    May 17, 2011
    My guess is you’ve designed a short scale that has a reach problem and horrible neck dive. Certainly different, but not something you’d want to play.
     
    Templar and Frankula like this.

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