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Question about converting a baritone…

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by llamalor2112, Oct 26, 2009.


  1. llamalor2112

    llamalor2112 Banned

    Sep 18, 2007
    Really want to have a bass vi type thing going on and have settled on either the schecter hellcat vi or the Musicman Silhouette bass. (Would much prefer the later) That was until I started thinking about the following...

    Anyhow, I was wondering if it would be at all possible to just string a baritone with these strings as they seem to be aimed at this sort of thing…

    http://accessories.musiciansfriend....te-6String-ShortScale-Bass-Strings?sku=100613

    What do ya’ think about this?

    If this were to work, is there any personal experience or hearsay about which of the following baritones is best suited to this sort of thing…

    http://guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Fender-Baritone-Special-HH?sku=511325

    http://guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Danelectro-Dead-on-67-Baritone-Electric-Guitar?sku=580357

    http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/SEMM/

    If not these, is there anything. I’m not saying that the final instrument has to play like a boutique instrument but at least a fairly competent bass/guitar hybrid.
     
  2. llamalor2112

    llamalor2112 Banned

    Sep 18, 2007
    What do you mean by that exactly. See, I'm curious, do you mean to say that the reduced scale will change the tension of the strings away from 'playing' like a bass or that the shorter scale will not allow the strings to even produce or be strung to a sub-one-octave tuning?

    What would I be getting myself into exactly if I just went ahead and strung one of these guits with a set of these strings and tuned E-e?

    I don't need it as a bass replacement just another tool to add to my arsenal.
     
  3. You most likely wouldn't be able to intonate it properly, and the strings will be way too floppy.

    Even with 30-inch scale basses, it's often impossible to get the low E to intonate precisely, but it's usually close enough to not be much of an issue.
     

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