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Reamping from computer

Discussion in 'Recording Gear and Equipment [BG]' started by conundrum, Oct 29, 2010.


  1. conundrum

    conundrum

    May 10, 2008
    Canada
    Would I need a "reamp box" to put between the line out of a computer and the input of a stompbox or my amp? And since most reamp boxes have an XLR in, a male TS to female XLR cable?

    (Or alternatively, a DI box and adapter.)

    I've got a PX5D and a Guitar Rig Mobile, but I'm not sure if they can be operated as line outs; or if they could, that they could then be directly hooked to a pedal in that manner.
     
  2. bongomania

    bongomania Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Oct 17, 2005
    PDX, OR
    owner, OVNIFX and OVNILabs
    No, no extra component is needed; connect the unbalanced computer out directly into the pedal or amp. All you need to do is start with the output volume of the computer, and the input gain of the amp, at fairly low settings. Then turn each of them up until it sounds good.
     
  3. Samsound

    Samsound

    Sep 28, 2010
    Basically, you want something between the computer and the amp to alter the impedance to something more guitar-like. They sell reamp boxes or this, and some DIs can work in reverse for this. Any buffered stompbox will also work - even in bypass mode (not true bypass). The pedal's buffer outputs impedances in the guitar range. As the previous poster mentioned, just watch your gain staging, unless you really want to overdrive that puppy.
     
  4. bongomania

    bongomania Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Oct 17, 2005
    PDX, OR
    owner, OVNIFX and OVNILabs
    Buffers do the reverse of what you say there. They take high (guitar-type) impedances and convert the signal to low impedance. They do not ever do the reverse, and they do not work backwards.

    It is possible that a passive DI or reamp box could make the impedance interaction between the sound card and the amp "more guitar-like", but this effect is miniscule compared to just adjusting the signal level appropriately.
     
  5. M0ses

    M0ses

    Sep 11, 2009
    Los Angeles
    +1
     
  6. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Retired Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    This is made specifically for that purpose, but it takes an XLR input.

    Radial X-Amp

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Samsound

    Samsound

    Sep 28, 2010
    Isn't that a bit of a generalization, though? You'd essentially be saying that any stompbox ruins the guitar/amp interaction, whereas in practice some do and some don't. I'm not an EE, so I can't really debate this. Just sharing what I've gleaned from other sources and tried myself.
     
  8. bongomania

    bongomania Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Oct 17, 2005
    PDX, OR
    owner, OVNIFX and OVNILabs
    Nope. What I said was that any buffer lowers the output impedance of the signal, and that's a solid fact. Many musicians intentionally put a buffer in their signal chain specifically for the benefits of lowering that impedance--so I'd hardly call it "ruining" the guitar/amp interaction. :) In fact guitarists will pay big bucks for "the best" buffer pedals, and active basses were invented specifically so there would be a buffer with no need for a pedal.
     

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