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replacement necks

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by Lowner, Feb 25, 2006.


  1. Lowner

    Lowner

    May 14, 2005
    Over Here
    I just got a fxer upper bass on e bay and it a Yamaha rbx260. The trouble is I thought I could glue the neck crack in it. But the craclk is in the headstock and runs right under a tuning peg and when I tune it up the crack upens up becasue of the tension. Now here is my problem ...where on earth do you get a 24 fret repalcement neck? i cant find one out here in cyber pace only 22 fret ones.
     
  2. Rodent

    Rodent Supporting Member Commercial User

    Dec 20, 2004
    Upper Left Corner (Seattle)
    Player-Builder-Founder: Regenerate Guitar Works
    I recommend you take it to a qualified repair person for a properly done repair. cracks can be fixed of you know what you're doing.

    All the best,

    R
     
  3. Lowner

    Lowner

    May 14, 2005
    Over Here

    I did and they told me to buy a new neck because it was not work repairing and that every time I would tune the bass the tension on the strings would pull the crack apart again in a few months. This is not a crack that is where the head stock and the neck meet but rather runs the headstock right under the hole for the tuning peg of the e string.And even goes into that hole as well. Cant post pics because it does not show up in the pics.
     
  4. tplyons

    tplyons

    Apr 6, 2003
    Madison, NJ
    I don't think you'll find a replacement Yammie neck like that. I'd recommend either go with the repair, find someone who isn't afraid to do it, or ditch the bass all together.
     
  5. Lowner

    Lowner

    May 14, 2005
    Over Here
    I am not necessarily looking for a Yammy neck ,just a 24 fret replacement that wil fit that's all. I once found a guitar body for 5 bucks with working pick ups at a flea market. It took me almost a year to find a neck for it. I ended up getting a telecaster neck for it after holding onto the guitar for almost a year. So itf I dont find anything right away I thing I wil just hold onto it and eventually it will come my way. I will build my bass yet.
     
  6. Lowner

    Lowner

    May 14, 2005
    Over Here
    What would happen if i got a neck with less than 24 frets? Is that really going to matter? Also if I decide to repair ti myself what would I do to fix it?
     
  7. kjbrowne

    kjbrowne

    Jun 14, 2005
    Florida
    Keep your eyes on ebay. There are a bunch of 260s going for less then 100 right now.
     
  8. Hookus

    Hookus

    Oct 2, 2005
    Austin, TX
    I find it hard to beleive it cannot be fixed. Plain old Titebond II would work just fine. Open up the crack (if you can), and fillit with glue, making sure that the crack gets glue all the way back in it. You can use a razor blade or piece or paper to work the glue in.

    Yellow glues, when bonded to wood, create a bond stronger than the wood itself. If the crack opens again, it won't be where it was glued.
     
  9. anonymous278347457

    anonymous278347457 Guest

    Feb 12, 2005
    If you think repair is not your route, then you should either:


    buy a rbx from somewhere and change the neck (this is if you REALLY want to keep your bass)


    other than that its probably not that worth it to replace parts
     
  10. Lowner

    Lowner

    May 14, 2005
    Over Here
    well, I decided to do repair it myself. I googled repairing a cracked neck .The only thing I fouind was this www.projectguitar.com/tut/prcrack.htm and went from there. I heated the wood with a hair dryer a bit to make the wood expand and then broke the split completley by smaking the hot wood with a rubber mallet.I used that titebond wood glue that was left over from gluing the leg back onto a kitchen chair. I spread the glue on the neck and the cracked piece and then put clamps on it. Right now the glue is drying. i figured on friday I will take the clamps off and sand it down.
     
  11. Rodent

    Rodent Supporting Member Commercial User

    Dec 20, 2004
    Upper Left Corner (Seattle)
    Player-Builder-Founder: Regenerate Guitar Works
    and another luthier was born :D

    gotsta be careful - once you fix one thing, all your friends will start heading your way and pretty soon you'll have a repair business on the side ... which will eventually be followed by a small shop to assemble basses from parts ... which will lead to a small shop where you build from scratch


    but then, don't ask me how I know this :eek:

    All the best,

    R
     
  12. tplyons

    tplyons

    Apr 6, 2003
    Madison, NJ
    Sounds good. We want pics of the repair when complete and a detailed explination on how well it worked ;)
     
  13. Hookus

    Hookus

    Oct 2, 2005
    Austin, TX
    Follow the instructions on the glue bottle. Titebond only needs to be clamped for 30 minuts, then you can start working with it. Just don't stress the joint, sanding off the glue excess won't hurt it, just don't string it up. Waiting until Friday is pointless.

    Remember, the instructions on the bottle are there for a reason, the manufacturer wants you to succeed.

    Just as a side note, I had a bookmatched piece of mahogany I was working with, 3/4" thick. I wanted to test the instructions, so glued it, ate lunch, came back took off the clamps, then bandsawed out a profile. No breaks. Then, I took a drop, and broke it right on the joint over the edge of a workbench, and the wood broke, not the glue joint. Remember, it was 3/4" thick, and it still broke the wood. That was after about an hour of dry time. Wood glue is not joke, Alphatic glue actually welds glue together.