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should i become a dealer?

Discussion in 'Live Sound [BG]' started by sirdugh, Apr 8, 2009.


  1. sirdugh

    sirdugh

    Dec 22, 2007
    columbia, mo
    what.....no, not THAT kind of dealer.

    I'm the audio person for a small film festival and we may be in the market for some audio gear.

    I would like to find someone who would give me a break on a package deal for a sizable amount of equipment (sizable for me, anyway, ~$25k).

    ....or should I just become a dealer so that I can get stuff on the cheap. If so, how do I go about that.

    Thanks for any advice.
     
  2. Mads

    Mads Supporting Member

    Jun 6, 2005
    Oslo, Norway
    My two cents:

    Become best friends with a small shop (a mom and dad shop) and tell them you've got 20K to spend...

    Order everything through them, get your discount make them happy, and you've got friends for life...

    Becoming a dealer yourself is a lot of work. At least where I come from.
     
  3. sirdugh

    sirdugh

    Dec 22, 2007
    columbia, mo
    that is a really good idea........and I'm a little embarrassed to admit that I've got a friend with a small shop here in my home town and i didn't even consider that.
     
  4. testing1two

    testing1two Gold Supporting Member

    Feb 25, 2009
    Southern California
    Most manufacturers will not let you become dealers with single orders. They have minimum quantities and sales requirements to prevent this exact scenario from happening. What Mads said about supporting a small local dealer is a fantastic idea provided they have access to the gear that's appropriate for your system design. The only disadvantage to this strategy is that the majority of smaller shops have a limited selection of available brands & products aimed less at the commercial system designer and more towards the musician/hobbyist. In the end you may have to order some portion of your equipment online or through a commercial audio vendor.

    Just remember this golden rule: buy what's right for the job, not what's in stock.
     
  5. GregShadoan

    GregShadoan

    Sep 1, 2008
    Oregon
    I would find the nearest LARGE sound company, who are already dealers, and work through them. That way you will have the options to get pro gear, at very near dealer pricing.
     

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