Snarliest, nastiest J pickups. GO.

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by thebass905, Dec 16, 2012.

  1. If you want aggressive, bright etc... I'd avoid any type of 'noiseless' pup. Single coils are noticeably better in these areas.
     
  2. joelb79

    joelb79

    Mar 22, 2006
    Lansing, Michigan
    I just put these back in my Jazz bass. You can make EMG's sound like anything, they are sonic chameleons. They do however have some benefits like fuller lows and increased open treble response. I find the bridge pickup has a bit more low mid growl than other brands, and since it has more lows it is FAR from thin sounding. The neck pickup seems purpose tuned for the position and sounds great solo'd. Noiseless. No bridge ground needed so no chance of electric shock through your lips when you sing. Sound guys never have to use a noise gate. They smile when they shape your tone as EMG's are easier to mix out front run direct than passive pickups.

    Don't be scared by the "sterile" comments or what not around here. If I followed Talkbass's advice all the time I'd still be fighting with my vintage pickups. EMG's sound great with flats too if you need some "vintage". I saw more EMG's on the 12/12/12 show as well in more genre's of music than any other pickup brand.

    And.. I play the blues. They sound great there.

    I don't buy that after trying EMG's. The Delano's with the big magnets I tried were aggressive as well, also hum cancelling. There is more to a design than meets the eye when it comes to pickups.


    To the OP who wants to go passive: If you'd consider passive pickups with an active preamp there is no reason to not consider EMG's with an active preamp. The battery for the pickups is 1500 hours of time. I have not found a bass preamp (onboard) with that kind of battery life, not even EMG's preamps. Preamps suck battery worse than any active pickup will.
     
  3. SGD Lutherie

    SGD Lutherie Inactive Commercial User

    Aug 21, 2008
    Bloomfield, NJ
    Owner, SGD Music Products
    There are some very bright noiseless pickups.
     
  4. Musiclogic

    Musiclogic Commercial User

    Aug 6, 2005
    Southwest Michigan
    Owner/Builder: HJC Customs USA, The Cool Lute, C G O
    EMG JX are very aggressive, So are DiMarzio Ultra Jazz, and DeLanos absolutely rock.
     
  5. joelb79

    joelb79

    Mar 22, 2006
    Lansing, Michigan
    I agree. I've had the Ultra J's too and they were sweet; very bright and deep with clear mids and agressive gain. Certainly the value suggestion of the group, although I got my EMG's new for about $30 over the price of the Dimarzio's. The ultra J's have a great bridge pickup tone as well. The Model-J's with 500k pots would be another combination for a brighter sounding bass that would give you the deep agressive tone.
     
  6. socialleper

    socialleper Bringer of doom and top shelf beer Supporting Member

    May 31, 2009
    Canyon Country, CA
    The consensus does seem to be that the JMVC and Ultra Jazz pickups are the gnarliest of the jazz bass pick ups. The price difference between these two is pretty huge; the Delanos are more than a $100 more expensive than the DiMarzios.
    The big question is does that price difference equal real tonal or quality difference? If you are investing in an upgrade on a bass you've already spent $1300 on, then $260 is a drop in the bucket. But if the set for half the price gives you similar performance, then why not?
    What say you all?
     
  7. Rickett Customs

    Rickett Customs

    Jul 30, 2007
    Southern Maryland
    Luthier: Rickett Customs...........www.rickettcustomguitars.com
    bill lawrence J-45, hands down.
     
  8. The original pickups in my '65 J are absolutely disgusting sounding. It's the most aggressive sounding bass I've ever played, and it's not a real high output bass. I'd source out some old pickups or try and find something as close to the originals as possible.
     
  9. georgiagoodie

    georgiagoodie The winged monkeys showed up

    Jan 8, 2008
    HELL
    I use both the DiMarzio Model Js and the Delano JMVC pups. They do not suck....

    attachment.jpg

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  10. georgiagoodie

    georgiagoodie The winged monkeys showed up

    Jan 8, 2008
    HELL
    I also use the Bill Lawrence Wilde pups. They also don't suck.
    attachment.jpg
     
  11. georgiagoodie

    georgiagoodie The winged monkeys showed up

    Jan 8, 2008
    HELL
    My newest J-pup is the Seymour Duncan Antiquity II (with "stealth" white covers). They definitely do not suck!
    attachment.jpg
     
  12. Mystic Michael

    Mystic Michael Hip No Ties

    Apr 1, 2004
    New York, NY
    No, I wouldn't say that. The Ultra Jazz have a wide frequency range, with extended lows & highs, and a clean, unhyped midrange. But they're smooth & refined - not aggressive, growly or "gnarly". Think smooth jazz or pop - not high-gain rawk. :meh:

    The DiMarzio Model J is the one you want. Those, with the Delano JMVCs, would be at the top of my list.

    MM
     
  13. Mystic Michael

    Mystic Michael Hip No Ties

    Apr 1, 2004
    New York, NY
    A very impressive collection of excellent pickups...with some cool basses, georgiagoodie. Well done! :cool:

    MM
     
  14. joelb79

    joelb79

    Mar 22, 2006
    Lansing, Michigan
    With 500k pots to increase the treble response. That'll get you aggressive tones somewhere around this:

    (Model J's, Geddy Lee Jazz, VT Bass)

    Same pickups. Unsure on the pots. Maybe JMJ can comment on his potentiometer choices (or has on the forums, use search).

    The best key to getting aggressive tones is in your setup and note attack though.
     
  15. socialleper

    socialleper Bringer of doom and top shelf beer Supporting Member

    May 31, 2009
    Canyon Country, CA
    How do you feel about the price difference between the Delano and the Dimarzio is worth it? Do the Deleno's earn that $100?
    If something is worth the money I'm willing to spend it, but if its just hype or expensive because fewer are produced, why bother.
     
  16. socialleper

    socialleper Bringer of doom and top shelf beer Supporting Member

    May 31, 2009
    Canyon Country, CA
    Sorry, misspoke there.
     
  17. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Yamaha, Ampeg, Line 6, EMG
    It happens. But yeah, I find the Ultra J's smoother and the Model J's gnarlier, too. But even though EMG's are super clean, I still find something very gnarly about them. Can't put my finger on it, but they sound super charged for being so super clean. In the end, what matters is your playing ;)
     
  18. georgiagoodie

    georgiagoodie The winged monkeys showed up

    Jan 8, 2008
    HELL
    Well....
    I'm not sure I can answer that.
    I suppose it is relative to you specific situation.
    I put the these DiMarzios on that '74 Jazz in 1979.
    I just put the Delano in the Tele.
    I have not had a lot of time with it, but it does seem to sound
    a tad more "snarly"/"burpy"/"Jaco-like" straight-up than the DiMarzios, but then again I have the '74 set up with phase &
    coil tap switches, so I can get a lot of different sounds with
    them....
    I suppose I was wanting to have different basses with different (quality) pups, so they would all sound different.
    However I DO LOVE the DiMarzios!, and have for 33 years...
     
  19. georgiagoodie

    georgiagoodie The winged monkeys showed up

    Jan 8, 2008
    HELL
    Thanks.
    I try.....
     
  20. Mystic Michael

    Mystic Michael Hip No Ties

    Apr 1, 2004
    New York, NY
    I'll chime in. The answer is, it depends. :meh:

    Bear in mind first of all that the DiMarzios are a heckuva deal, and probably underpriced - relative to the competition.

    For only $100 more, I would say that the Delanos are most definitely not overpriced - relative to the value you get. They're super - but not necessarily everyone's cup o' tea.

    The Model J has a relatively more subdued upper midrange & high frequency response, that can be opened up somewhat - as JoelB stated - by using a 500k tone and/or volume pot. Still, its main strength is in the lows and the lower mids. It sounds thick. And when played in a high-gain situation, it snarls & growls very nicely. It's an uncouth beast of a pickup. :cool:

    The JMVC is hotter & brighter, IMHO. It also has a relatively more open, more extended upper midrange & high-frequency response. But the mids & lows are also very present - and very powerful.

    The JMVC has excellent attack characteristics. If slapping/tapping is in your bag o' tricks to any significant extent, the JMVC will thrill you. Think of the JMVC as more modern, the Model J more vintage. But both will knock your socks off, given the right playing environment (i.e. instrument, rig, settings, technique, etc.).

    Hope that helps...

    MM