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The TalkBass Cigar Club

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by Bassic83, Jul 23, 2007.


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  1. Bassic83

    Bassic83

    Jul 26, 2004
    Texas, USSA
    Now forming- if you enjoy a good stick, which several of you do, this is the place! Talk about your favorites, share reviews, even share some sticks if you are so inclined...:hyper: Tips, technique, storage, etc...let's talk about cigars! PM me for your TB Cigar Club number!
     
  2. Bassic83

    Bassic83

    Jul 26, 2004
    Texas, USSA
    Tip #1- To infuse your cigars with a little extra kick, pour a shot of your favorite spirits (rum, cognac, whiskey, whatever..) into a small container, put it in a corner of a cigar box, load your sticks in around it, close lid, leave for a week or two. Check the spirits level once every other day, refill as necessary. You'll get that good flavor in every stick in there. Don't use your storage humidor, don't use any other humidification device.

    Carlos had a whiskey cask with about two or three inches of whiskey left in it. He built a little rack in the bottom, and would put cigars in there for a week or two to infuse. Man, were they tasty! He tried smaller containers with rum and cognac, they were incredible as well. Works really well, and it's cheap! I'd imagine Amaretto and Kahlua would be tasty, too...:)
     
  3. Oxblood

    Oxblood Banned

    Apr 17, 2005
    Baltimore, MD
    Best thread on TB. Period.

    Pics of my humidor and my small collection of cigars coming tomorrow! :D
     
  4. Bassic83

    Bassic83

    Jul 26, 2004
    Texas, USSA
    If anyone thinks this might be a good idea, let me know...

    Idea is to send a cigar to the next one on the list. I could start by sending a cigar to DaveTakis, which he would smoke and give a review of. Then he would pick a cigar from his stash and send it to the next person, who would smoke it and give a review, and so on. That way, you'd never know what you were gonna get, and you'd get to try some new smokes you might never pick up in a store. Who's down for that? I already sent DaveTakis some...he's member #2. Dave would be next, he's #3, and so on...
     
  5. Bassic83

    Bassic83

    Jul 26, 2004
    Texas, USSA
    Hey Oxblood, nice sig! What's this TB Cigar Club? Hey, I clicked on it and it sent me right to it! Whaddya know! :D
     
  6. The one time I had a real cigar (fat cuban type thing) was when my first child was born. I inhaled and I almost died. I felt ill for hours afterwards too.

    So perhaps some instruction on preparing and smoking them for the less cultured, cancer avoiding smokers may be in order as well as how to flavour them :D :D
     
  7. Bassic83

    Bassic83

    Jul 26, 2004
    Texas, USSA
    Absolutely! I'll get on it as soon as I get to work! :D
     
  8. Freddels

    Freddels Musical Anarchist

    Apr 7, 2005
    Sutton, MA
    My brother and his daughter own a cigar store. I get to go in the walk-in humidor and check out whatever they have. They can tell you just about everything about cigars. Unfortunately, I don't smoke. :)
     
  9. Other than an occasional Acid Kuba Kuba, I really don't care for flavored cigars. I usually end up giving away the ones people give to me because I don't want to put them in my humidor.

    Other than a few Padron's everything in my Humidor is from La Harencia in Ybor City, FL. I stop there at least once a month!!

    http://www.ramirezcigars.com/main.html
     
  10. My current favorite (and has been for a good while now) is the Padron 1964 series. Anyone got a place they know of that gives you a good deal on a box of em?
     
  11. Dan1099

    Dan1099 Dumbing My Process Down

    Aug 7, 2004
    Michigan
    Hey, sort of a casual smoker here, but interested in smoking more, and trying some new ones. I don't own a humidor, and am not particularly interested in owning a large one, but a small one, maybe slightly bigger than a cigar box or so, would be fine. Any suggestions? Also, and suggestions I should try, cigar wise? I'm not interested in spending a bunch, but under 10$ a cigar is fine. I'm not a fan of flavored cigars, either.
     
  12. Just do a Google search and compare prices. I keep buying the Aniversary sampler when they are on sale. Usually around $100 bucks.

    I like to follow cigarbid.com also but I pretty much stick with the local Florida stuff.
     
  13. eedre

    eedre

    Feb 26, 2007
    St. Louis,MO
    Sign me up please, what's my # ?? :)
     
  14. Bassic83

    Bassic83

    Jul 26, 2004
    Texas, USSA
    OK, this is by request...

    Prepping your cigar is a ritual, and an integral part of the smoking of a really fine cigar. There are as many methods of accomplishing this task as you'd care to find, let's look at a few of the favorites...

    1) The punch- A punch is a little circle of steel designed to put a hole in the end of a cigar. Most seem to be 6-8mm in diameter, though I have seen extremes varying from 4mm to a whopping 10mm! To use this, you hold the cigar and push the blade into the end cap of the cigar. This method does not work very well on torpedoes, for obvious reasons...

    What I tend to do with robustos, toros, churchills and the like is to wet the entire endcap with my mouth. This helps keep the endcap from splitting when you punch it. Once you've moistened it with your tongue, let it sit for a couple minutes. Just before you punch it, moisten it again, then with a twisting motion, gently push the blade into the center of the stick. It doesn't need to go very deep to get a clean punch. Twisting as you remove it, you should be left with a neat, uniform little circular hole. Now draw on the cigar a couple times. This lets you taste the raw tobacco, and also lets you know if it is wrapped too tight (lots of resistance to the draw), or if it is too loose (almost no resistance, will burn hot). If you feel like you're trying to suck a milkshake through a straw, it's too tight. They make something called a "draw poker" to help this- it basically is a rod that pokes a hole through the length of the cigar.

    2) The guillotine- This method utilizes a blade to slice off the end of the cigar. I usually reserve this for very slim cigars, or for torpedoes. There are two basic kinds of guillotines- the single blade, and the dual blade. The single blade is usually a very cheap plastic body with a finger hole at either end, and one angled or curved blade that passes through the middle hole. They're OK, but a much finer and more accurate cut can be made with a dual blade. The dual has a blade attached to each finger hole, when you put the end of the cigar into it, the blades slice from both ends. Most nicer guillotines are of this type.

    When cutting the end, put the end cap into the guillotine just far enough to get a good cut. Maybe 1/16" should be good enough. The idea is to slice the end of the end cap, not to remove an inch. The end cap has a gum on it that holds the wrapper together. Try not to cut below the first ring of the end cap, or you'll be trying to rewind your cigar, and that's no fun at all! ;)

    Another benefit of this type is that you can cut through a cigar and relight it if it runs down one side, or if you just want to save some for later and want a way to get a clean cut, removing the cherry, this is it.

    3) The Cigar Scissor- This looks like a very short pair of scissors with curved blades. It basically does what a guillotine does, but its advantage is that it can handle larger ring gauges. It is also very precise if kept sharp.

    4) The Notch Cutter- This looks kind of like a weird stapler. It has a blade on the end that cuts a V-shaped notch into the end of the cigar. I don't see these very often, but some people swear by them.

    When using this, you place the end cap of the cigar against a stop, then press down on the bar containing the cutter blade, which slices the notch into the end of the cigar. Advantage- supposedly quick, leaves most of the end cap intact.
     
  15. plexibass

    plexibass

    Jun 30, 2005
    awesssssssssssssssssssoooooooooooooooooooooooommmmmeeee.
    i just posted this quote in another thread but it bears reposting:
    I learned a very important lesson last night. there are few pleasures in life GREATER than smoking a fresh hand rolled cigar. and by fresh i mean within a few days of it actually being made. i have never in my life experienced that kind of euphoria while smoking a cigar. now if i only had some 12yo macallen single malt.
    i am by no means a cigar afficiando like eric [bassic83] but i will tell you this. that cigar he sent me could very easily repalce every cigar in my humidor without a second thought. tonight, the torpedo you sent!!!!!

    lets give it up for eric. he is a fine choice for president of the tb cigar club. this thread will prove to be educational and informative. we should also start a list of our favorite tobacconists so if anyone travels, they know where to go.
     
  16. eedre

    eedre

    Feb 26, 2007
    St. Louis,MO
    I usually smoke those Macanudo Minis - as I do not have time to smoke a full stogie. Semi-harsh taste, but relaxing.
     
  17. plexibass

    plexibass

    Jun 30, 2005
    this is a fantastic idea. i'm all for it!!!! someone pm me an adress to send a cigar or 2 to.
     
  18. plexibass

    plexibass

    Jun 30, 2005

    if the cigars have the plastic sleeves on them, should they be removed?
     
  19. I always do...I feel like it helps the humidity around the cigars be more even when they are in the humidor, but from what Ive read online, it probably doesn't matter too much.
     
  20. Bassic83

    Bassic83

    Jul 26, 2004
    Texas, USSA
    Yes, I find that the plastic tends to burn too quickly, and the smoke is very harsh. Also gets that weird "burning wires" taste going on... :eek::eyebrow:

    If it is wrapped in cello, the molecules that impart the flavor from your spirit of choice never get a chance to get into the cigar. They are effectively blocked by the plastic. Cello is OK for storing or mailing, to prevent moisture loss, but I remove cellos before I put sticks in the humidor. That way, the humidity remains in the cigar, not locked out.
     

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