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Unique 5 string tuning

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by stoptheglaciers, Oct 21, 2010.


  1. stoptheglaciers

    stoptheglaciers

    Oct 21, 2010
    First post here on TalkBass, digging the forum so far.

    My question is about the tuning I use. My style is technical death metal, and my guitarists tune to B F# B E G# C# (drop B).

    How I tune my bass is by matching them on my 4 high strings, and making an octave of the 3rd string on my low 5th string:
    F# B F# B E

    The main reason I match them on the 4 strings is because its makes matching their riffs in some locations much easier, and in many cases much less of a stretch. I also love having the low f#, cause I use it to create a lot of unique major triads, either by playing a third below the guitars root, or playing the third note of the triad, dropped an octave.

    I'm a guitar convert, so I'm sure this isn't conventional tuning at all. Just wondering if anyone else tuned similarly to this, or just general thoughts.
     
  2. grisezd

    grisezd

    Oct 14, 2009
    Ohio
    When I first read (scanned) this I thought you were talking about the top string being an octave above the third string. That's something I've thought about trying for the same sorts of reasons you're dropping down an octave. I found that on my five (now departed) I tended to use the low B to avoid a long stretch rather than for the extended range.

    If you can keep it all straight and it sounds good to you, then I don't see any reason to stick with standard tuning, or string arrangement, or, hell, anything else. I ask my wife (a drummer) all the time why drummers all arrange their drums by size (so thier rolls all sound the same?), why they don't mix it up a bit?
     

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