Which Mixer?

Discussion in 'Recording Gear and Equipment [BG]' started by anotherbassist, May 30, 2005.

  1. My band has decided to record a demo and were going to buy a mixer. Were looking to use 3-4 mics for drums, 1 mic for vocals, one unmic'd guitar and one unmic'd bass. What size mixer should we get? I'll be running my bass through the XLR lineout on my amp and I believe the guitarist will be doing the same. So does that mean we need a mixer with 7 mic inputs? Could someone show me a certain mixer that would work for us?
  2. rubo


    Aug 25, 2003
    Always think ahead, first you think you need only 6 inputs then before you know it you're up to 16. Lets work back wards, what is your budget?

  3. Kelly Lee

    Kelly Lee Yeah, I'm a guy! Supporting Member

    Feb 17, 2004
    Marana, AZ, USA
    I think more needs to be known about what your trying to do.

    Are you just wanting to record the whole band at once onto a stereo track or are you wanting to record each instrument to its own track?
  4. Were going to try to record everyone at once and we'll be running the mixer into quartz studio on the pc. I dont really no our budget, less than $300. After we get the recording done were burn it to some cds (I dont understand stereo and mono very much).
  5. rubo


    Aug 25, 2003
    Sure you can do all of those things, but be careful with the amp going into the XLR input because that way you're doing double amplification, you could blow your op-amps or capasitors on your mixer, and your speakers as well.

    Also one thin people disregard a lot is the quality of the cables, you wont believe how much difference it makes, specially eliminating extra noise. So you'll need at least $75 - $100 for some quality cables. Best bet is call http://www.gepco.com/
    they'll make you custom made cables for a good price. Or if you're being everything from one place then get some Monster or Mogami cables. for Mics you'll need balanced XLR to XLR, for D.I. and bass depending on the D.I. Inputs and outputs, but my guess is unbalanced mono 1/4" to 1/4". And from the mixer to your sound card you have to check what kind of main outs the E8 has and what kind of inputs your sound card has. My guess is XLR out on the mixer and 1/4" input on the sound card. Make sure you measure slightly longer cables then you need, os you don't get stuck with short ones. Remember the shorter the cable the less noise you'll get.

  6. Ok but what do you mean about my amp, its a fender rumble 100 with an XLR out with a ground lift switch (I dont know what that is)? I wasnt planning on running my bass through a DI but I was with guitar.
  7. rubo


    Aug 25, 2003
    It depends are you using the amp for a certain effect or a tone, if not it will only add more noise, so you can skip it, and simply go from your bass guitar to your D.I. to you mixer or skip the D.I and straight into the mixer. The mixer has a powerfull enough pre-amp to drive your bass and record a decent level. Once you get the mixer experiment and see how it is with the Rumbler and without. What kind of speakers are you using or will be using?

  8. Droog


    Aug 14, 2003

    The Mackie VLZ PRO's are nicer than the Spirits by Soundcraft. Quiter Pre's anyway. The Onyx series are slick too, especially for multitrack recording.

    Based on the original post however, I would say, buy what ever fits your budget and need. If you make something cheap sound good, then imagine what will happen when you buy something a little nicer.
  9. rubo


    Aug 25, 2003
    My friend had the VLZ in his studio, it would just suck the life out of the sound, it's harsh and dull sounding. I used to bring different mixers to his studio like Allen & Heath and others for comparison - there was no comparison. If you're buying a mixer simply for the mixing options not it's sound then there are lots of cheaply priced mixers out there wiht tons of options. But why waste money if you can add a few more bucks and get something decent. I always preferred the sound of British mixers to the USA ones.

    anotherbassist - if you really want a killer sounding mixer for more money then check out Allen & Heath Mixwizard 12:2 model.


    Used they go fro about $500 US.

    I owned one it was the 14/4/2 model, absolutely loved it. Warm, quite and transparent and very musical. Also had a killer EQ. I upgraded to Midas Venice 160 which is on another level by itself.

  10. What about those cheap blue Yamaha mixers? I was planning on running through my amp to get the tone from that. What exactly does the groundlift do?
  11. Bryan R. Tyler

    Bryan R. Tyler TalkBass: Usurping My Practice Time Since 2002 Staff Member Administrator Gold Supporting Member

    May 3, 2002
    I ordered one of the Yamaha MG 12/4s a little while back. It's not in yet, but I can give you my impressions of it in a week or so.
  12. matt bass

    matt bass

    Apr 28, 2003
    Staffs, England
    I use an MG12/4 for recording, bought used. Personally im starting to regret not buying the next model up purely for the extra input capacity.

    Very easy control pannel, plenty of ins/outs, decent pres for the money and not overly noisy.

    For the money, i cant complain.

  13. Incubus


    Mar 28, 2005
    I have used the Onyx in studios. It is a very, very good product but it is a wee bit overpriced. Mackie's support tends to be un-helpful.

    If you are really that low on money, get a Behringer mixer.


    From what i here, those are really nice mixers. If you have the money. Good luck!
  14. Droog


    Aug 14, 2003
    Yeah, I would not say that Mackie has the best support. Ever since they sold out.

    Indeed Allen and Heath and the Midas line are great mixers. Though for tracking I would love to have aTube Tracker Way richer sound for recording purposes, but lots o' $$$ too.