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Bass/computer question

Discussion in 'Recording Gear and Equipment [BG]' started by Lowpro, Dec 28, 2006.


  1. Lowpro

    Lowpro

    Sep 25, 2006
    Birmingham, AL
    Is there a way/program/setup where I can take my computer, which has a decent sound card, and somehow hook my bass into it, as well as my amp, and have my computer function as a multi-effects pedal using a program that just might be out there which can do that?

    I wanna find a damn workaround so I dont have to look/spend for authentic pedals.
     
  2. Yup, sure. Have a look here for a nice list of software with reviews.
    http://emusician.com/dsp/

    You should have decent hardware and a plenty fast cpu, otherwise you'll end up with too much latency; a delay between the time that you play and when you hear the processed audio out of the computer, making it pretty much useless.
     
  3. Under Linux I use Jack to "wire" an effects host between the computer's input and output.
     
  4. arbarnhart

    arbarnhart

    Nov 16, 2006
    Raleigh, NC
    You can test your latency with an application available here:

    http://www.guitar-fxbox.com/sctest.htm

    And go to their main page also:

    http://www.guitar-fxbox.com/

    They have a reasonably priced ($20 to register) software effects package that you can download and try.
     
  5. Did you mean to quote me? Since you brought it up, I already know my latency is 2.5 ms or so.
     
  6. arbarnhart

    arbarnhart

    Nov 16, 2006
    Raleigh, NC
    No, I meant to quote BassoProfondo's post about latency and clicked on the wrong quote button.
     
  7. That's not bad at all, the effects sound pretty good. I guess that most modern pcs don't have a problem with latency anyways.
     
  8. Depends on how you go about it. Under Windows, plain old WDM drivers will probably lag quite a bit. If there is no ASIO driver for your card, try ASIO4ALL, which works on top of the WDM driver and allows you to select a fixed latency. Different computers can go lower than others, but a modern computer should be able to go low.

    EDIT: That software appears to do the same thing that ASIO4ALL does so it shouldn't be necessary to use it. Other software may vary.
     

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