1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  

Finding the right balance

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by rgarcia26, Jun 11, 2012.


  1. rgarcia26

    rgarcia26

    Jun 9, 2008
    Miami Florida
    Does it look like this bass would be in balance like this?
    2012-06-11_19-18-28_528.gif
     
  2. Beej

    Beej

    Feb 10, 2007
    Vancouver Island
    It looks like it would not be too far off in balance, but if that's a 34" scale, when it's on a strap, the headstock would feel like it's two feet away IMHO...
     
  3. rgarcia26

    rgarcia26

    Jun 9, 2008
    Miami Florida
    Yes is a 34".... The neck is a little long.. I'm not sure by what freet should be the neck joint
     
  4. You could probably take a cue from the ol' jack cassady -
    http://www.dv247.com/assets/products/52537_l.jpg

    Looks to join around fret #15.
    I don't own one of these, but I've played a couple at Long and McQuade and I quite like the balance.
     
  5. However, the Casady only has twenty frets, and probably (don't quote me) a shorter scale length.

    *edit*
    I was wrong - 34" scale.

    Sorry for double (er, triple) posting here, best of luck with this bass - great looking top and neck!
     
  6. pilotjones

    pilotjones

    Nov 8, 2001
    US-NY-NYC
    With the neck positioned as shown?

    That doesn't look like a good idea. I'll agree with Beej that the headstock would be quite a reach; I'll disagree in saying that I think it will neck dive; and I'll add that your bridge will be more than halfway up from the bottom of the body to the top. This is higher than any electric bass, electric guitar, or even acoustic guitar, and would make the beast very uncomfortable to play.
     
  7. rgarcia26

    rgarcia26

    Jun 9, 2008
    Miami Florida
    I see what if I brig the neck in a couple inches, the bridge right in the middle of the f-Holes?

    like This:

    2012-06-12_09-47-41_991.gif


    The bridge:


    2012-06-12_09-56-13_395.gif
     
  8. pilotjones

    pilotjones

    Nov 8, 2001
    US-NY-NYC
    That would be an improvement in balance and ergonomics. It may or may not be enough.

    A few things you might consider relating to this:
    - the bridge is still higher up than any normal bass
    - one guy here had a very high-end bass made for him similar to that a few years back. I believe he ended up not using it because of playability. (edit) the bass was made by a guitar maker who had rarely if ever made a bass. (/edit)
    - check out the layout of an epiphone jack Cassidy. This is probably the best ergonomically of this type. Note the bridge placement, and extended cutaway
    - along those lines, this type of body is not the best mate for a twenty four fret neck
    - is this hollowbody? If so you must make careful consideration of strength if mounting a stop-type bridge to the middle of the body top.

    (edit) man, autoco-wreck was killing me on this post ;) (/edit)
     
  9. rgarcia26

    rgarcia26

    Jun 9, 2008
    Miami Florida
    1) I totality see what ur saying... I should be looking at a 20th fret neck :bawl:

    2) is hollow only where the f-holes are, not in the midle...Pickups and brindge... is not like chamber body... just a hollow looking
     
  10. rgarcia26

    rgarcia26

    Jun 9, 2008
    Miami Florida
    Ok ok... the neck have to be this in to be at least closer that what is supose to... this should be feeling closer to my P-bass (No exactly but closer) and the 24th frets not the optimum neck for this bass... I can only add one pickup(Humbucker), Two it will look weird.

    2012-06-12_16-03-55_658.gif
     
  11. rgarcia26

    rgarcia26

    Jun 9, 2008
    Miami Florida
    My cousin who build guitars told me that I may be able to take off two frets... and may be cut down the neck... I just need to find out how long the trust rod is?

    :D
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.