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Future of music

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by Honkey tonk, Sep 20, 2019.


  1. Honkey tonk

    Honkey tonk Turn it up Supporting Member

    Feb 10, 2019
    Lower 48
    Just curious what you think the next big thing in music will be .
    The industry needs something new to keep it interesting, is it a new style or a twist Of the old .
    what ever it is I kinda hope that the bass guitar plays a big role . Really what makes a genre is it a time a place that makes it , it ...
    what is the spark that makes it all happen?
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2019
    NoSlapForYou likes this.
  2. I am not hopeful. . . There is some really great music out there now, but it gets no airplay and has more of a cult following. The music industry is in shambles I think. YMMV
     
  3. ctmullins

    ctmullins fueled by beer and coconut Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 18, 2008
    MS Gulf Coast
    I'm highly opinionated and extremely self-assured
    The music industry is completely separate from music.

    The next big thing in the music industry will be whatever is most profitable with the least expense.

    The next big thing in music will be driven by emerging artists.

    Perhaps you meant the musical instrument industry?

    Music is created by artists expressing themselves. When they do, they have the option of embracing emerging technology in the musical instrument industry, or they can try to create new art with existing instruments. Either approach, or a blend of the two, can result in fantastic new music. Or mediocre new music. Usually both.

    The quality of that new music, combined with public exposure (perhaps aided by agents in the music industry) and public perception, are factors in determining who the next big artists are. Those artists are then courted by the music industry in the hopes of generating more cash flow.

    Artists create art because they are artists. Instrument makers create new instruments because they are fascinated with the application of technology and/or craftsmanship to musical expression. Music industry agents do what they do in the hopes of making money from the efforts of artists and instrument manufacturers.

    What was the question again?
     
  4. Honkey tonk

    Honkey tonk Turn it up Supporting Member

    Feb 10, 2019
    Lower 48
    I agree that the industry is kind of at a Null, the whole digital thing has made its history as sort of a on going mystery . Getting past all that it's got to be good
     
    DJ Bebop and Glenn Johnson like this.
  5. Honkey tonk

    Honkey tonk Turn it up Supporting Member

    Feb 10, 2019
    Lower 48
    Physics

    I used to have this wild theory,
    "knob theory" one new and different knob would inspire a new piece of gear that would inspire a new song that would inspire a new genre that ultimately inspires a new generation.
     
  6. Coolhandjjl

    Coolhandjjl Supporting Member

    Oct 13, 2010
    Appleton
    In terms of world-wide revenues, here's the top three in order:
    Rap/HipHop
    EDM
    Rock-Pop

    Also consider that Rap/HipHop is older that Rock was when Rap/HipHop first hit the scene. We're overdue for another seismic shift.
     
  7. I hope so.
     
    Honkey tonk likes this.
  8. JRA

    JRA my words = opinion Supporting Member

    00 images2b3.
    per the OP: have an idea and make it 'manifest'. see what happens. repeat until satisfied.
     
  9. I'd say K-Pop,J-Pop and C-Pop will soon replace those genres.

    Sales figures for music in 2018 totaled $19.1 billion, K-Pop accounted for $4.7 billion of that.
     
  10. Joe Nerve

    Joe Nerve Supporting Member

    Oct 7, 2000
    New York City
    Endorsing artist: Musicman basses
    I just wrote a long response, and then deleted it when I saw this.

    This is my now my response. Its much better than mine was :).

    I'd say thanks for saving me the time, if I hadn't written my response before reading the thread :) :)...

     
    Robert B, Ghook, Bunk McNulty and 3 others like this.
  11. ctmullins

    ctmullins fueled by beer and coconut Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 18, 2008
    MS Gulf Coast
    I'm highly opinionated and extremely self-assured
    :roflmao::thumbsup::cool:
     
  12. Chrisk-K

    Chrisk-K

    Jan 20, 2010
    Maryland, USA
    Downloading and streaming killed music.
     
    Wisebass, bassdude51, spvmhc and 4 others like this.
  13. McFarlin

    McFarlin Supporting Member

    Oct 27, 2011
    Austin, TX
    I thought it was ASMR trigger sounds on YouTube.
     
  14. DWBass

    DWBass The Funkfather Supporting Member

    It killed the potential income for artists. Good music is alive and well. Mainstream radio just doesn't promote it. In order to profit, musicians have to play live shows and sell merchandise at those events. Record companies and radio stations did a disservice by playing watered down, loop driven pop, rock and smooth jazz music. Many smooth jazz radio stations have gone by the wayside due to the UN-listenable elevator music that no one cared for. Got so bad that some artists adopted the style just to get airplay. Still not selling enough records to make a living so they have to hit the road. Many artists have gone the independent route. Should have been that way. Prince made a killing by operating on his own. Record companies are liars and thieves! Radio stations still operating under payola!
     
  15. bucephylus

    bucephylus Supporting Member Commercial User

    Aug 18, 2002
    General Manager TecPadz LLC
    IMO, the discouraging thing is that the A&R departments have decided that using computers instead of musicians is more profitable. It probably is. But, now we are hearing more and more “hits” cranked out by songwriter backed up by computer tracks.

    Charlie Puth’s ‘Attention’ was the first where I learned this was actually pressing forward. The computer generated bass track in that one actually sounds pretty decent, even if it’s a computer.

    Yesterday, I heard the new Post Malone tune ‘Circles.’ Same kind of deal; but in this case, at least on the car radio, I thought they had a guitar player playing the bass line. Went back and looked / listened more carefully at it today; and, no it’s simply a very feeble sounding bass patch in a computer.

    So, that’s where the biz is headed; which, from my perspective, is a very bad direction. Computers do NOT make music.

    Another thing; I recently spent a weekend in Austin, where 20 some odd years ago I spent a lot of time with the straight job. Oh, how times have changed. Not even close to the Live Music Capital that it used to be. Subsequent discussions with local to my area Austin transplants turned up the theory that the “hipster” culture that moved in over the past two decades with the software tech boom simply isn’t as interested in live music, preferring to get their entertainment on line. IDK about that either way, but Austin was a mere shadow of what I remember. Sad.
     
  16. ctmullins

    ctmullins fueled by beer and coconut Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 18, 2008
    MS Gulf Coast
    I'm highly opinionated and extremely self-assured
    Depends on your definition of “music”.

    One definition is, quite simply, “organized sound”. By that definition, computers are capable of making music.

    Perhaps what you’re trying to say is that computers do not produce art. Again, it depends on definitions. If we define “art” as “the subjective expression of human emotions, values, or principles”, then no, a computer can’t make art.

    But, computers only do what they’re programmed to do. And since we haven’t reached the Terminator future yet, all computers are still being programmed by humans, which means a computer is a valid tool for human expression.

    It’s a gray area, to be sure. Sophisticated tools like computers certainly make it easier to create a dope beat with sick bass drops, but there’s still a human involved somewhere.

    Anyway, this sort of illustrates my earlier point: The music industry will latch on to anything that generates cash with minimal expense. As long as consumers are willing to buy music created with (or by) computers, then that phenomenon will persist.
     
  17. Honkey tonk

    Honkey tonk Turn it up Supporting Member

    Feb 10, 2019
    Lower 48
    When I was studying audio I had teacher tell me and really he thought the future of music went something like this.
    "Ok Google make a song D minor early Beatles vibe with extra bass and some grit"
     
  18. bucephylus

    bucephylus Supporting Member Commercial User

    Aug 18, 2002
    General Manager TecPadz LLC
    To qualify my comment, American Popular Music has a long history of derivitized evolution, incorporating a number of disparate elements. BUT, the main thing that glued it together was live performance by human beings.

    Of course, the term “Music” applies equally to Tibetan chants; but, my comment was relative to the progression that most of us have participated in; which does indeed seem headed into non sequitor directions, based on money vs craft. IMO
     
    inthevelvet, iunno and ctmullins like this.
  19. Gorn

    Gorn

    Dec 15, 2011
    Queens, NY
    It'll be pretty much like it is now. Pop music will be about relationships and rising above adversity in 4/4. The rest of music probably won't change much.
     
    PillO, TakeABreak, higain617 and 3 others like this.
  20. mmon77

    mmon77 Supporting Member

    Jul 9, 2008
    Southern MN
    Eventually people will stop creating music, since there is no way to make money doing it. Then AI will take over. All we will have for new music is stuff like this:

     
    Nevada Pete and nbsipics like this.

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