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G aug diad?

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by muthagoose, Feb 23, 2004.


  1. muthagoose

    muthagoose

    Jan 18, 2004
    Sweden
    First of all I would like to start of by saying hi, since this is my first post on this board. I usually post at the bass guitar(!) section of www.musiciansforums.com, a site which I'm quite sure some of you are familiar with. I'm looking forward to becoming an active member of these forums and I'm hoping I will learn alot from this place, and maybe even contribute in some way every once in a while :)

    To top it off here's some short info about me; I'm from Sweden and I'm 19 years old, been playing bass a little over a year now and I'm loving every minute of it :)

    Anyways, on to my question.

    I saw somebody asking what notes a Gaug diad where made of, and I assumed that this would be a chord built out of 2nds, as opposed to the use of 3rds in triads, and it being an Augmented chord, consisted of the notes G, A, B, the root + a major 2nd + a major 2nd. But apparently this wasn't the case, so now I'm wondering exactly what a diad is and how you build chords with them.

    Sorry about this being a bit long, but I didn't want to make a separate thread just to introduce myself ;)
     
  2. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    Well generally a diad is the equivalent of what would be a two note chord in other terms(worded carefully so as to avoid a dumb argument again ;)

    I've never seen a Gaug Diad, but I can say with some certainty that it would be simply a G and a D#

    D# being an augmented 5th above G.
     
  3. Slot

    Slot

    Oct 17, 2003
    Sydney - The Shire
    oOoOh ......Gaug diad.

    .....ive been staring at this question for the last 10 minutes wondering what the hell a gaug(as in gauge) diad is:oops: *inflicts self uppercut*

    .......i'll second the G, D# notion
     
  4. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    :) yeah, on first look that's what I was thinking too
     
  5. Boplicity

    Boplicity Supporting Member

    Gosh, I finally get it...a G augmented diad. I thought "gaug" was some strange and rare musical term. I was about to do a Google search to see if i could find it.
     
  6. Slot

    Slot

    Oct 17, 2003
    Sydney - The Shire
    lol...i had google loaded and ready to go aswell
     
  7. Lovebown

    Lovebown

    Jan 6, 2001
    Sweden
    In the real world of music you wont really run into a "G augmented diad".

    The term "G aug diad" as a chord symbol or term, does not, as far as I know, exist.

    /lovebown
     
  8. Richard Lindsey

    Richard Lindsey

    Mar 25, 2000
    Metro NYC
    I agree entirely.

    If what's meant is simply G + D#, then that's just an augmented 5th interval, and there's no need to invoke the term diad (actually spelled dyad). An interval involves two pitches by definition.
     
  9. Lovebown

    Lovebown

    Jan 6, 2001
    Sweden
    Glad to see we agree, Richard! ;)

    /lovebown
     
  10. Doesn't "gaug diad" mean something rude in Welsh?
     
  11. Blackbird

    Blackbird Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 18, 2000
    California
    G aug is a chord.

    The term "diad" is not wrong, but it's really unusual. Maybe it's a common term in Sweden.

    The distance between two notes is usually called an interval, but then you'd also say what the interval is. Simply saying Gaug implies a major triad with an augmented fifth (G,B,D#). If you were only playing the root G and the D#, we'd call the interval an augmented fifth.
     
  12. Lovebown

    Lovebown

    Jan 6, 2001
    Sweden
    Nope it's not a common term in Sweden, not in my side of the country at least ;)

    What I've learnt is that a G and a D# (for instace) played at the same time, as if it were a chord, is an interval played harmonically. An interval played melodically is thus played one after another.

    The only reason I could see why you'd want to call a G and D# something other than an harmonic interval is if you'd write it as a chord symbol. On the other hand, G and D# isn't a chord, so you'd probably be better off writing the interval out in notation and skip the symbol.

    /lovebown
     
  13. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    While I've never heard it calle a "G aug Diad", I've seen this figure more than a few times in the chord symbols written over tabs in "PowerChord Rock". It usually follows a regular power chord, and often resolves up to a a Ma6th, and sometimes goes up to a mi7th, as in Zeppelin's "Kashmir" (if my addled memory serves):

    D5....D+5....D6....D7..... (all in "power chord" notation)
     
  14. Lovebown

    Lovebown

    Jan 6, 2001
    Sweden
    I'm sure you have seen that Chris, but the "rules" of notation and so forth doesen't really seem to apply to these "transcriptions" you mention. IMO, they aren't really theoretically correct, but rather written as such that rock guitarists who don't know standard notation and generally don't fully understand chord symbols will be able to play the tune. My experience with the crowd that these books (rock transcriptions , mainly) are targetted towards is they don't give a **** if they don't know what's going on theoretically , as long as they're able to play the tune as performed by the original artist.

    If they write out root(D) a major 6th like D6, I'd like to see how they write out the true D6 chord which is a major triad and an added 6th?

    /lovebown


    Edit: Please completely cover up all swears. Thank you.
    Joe
     
  15. muthagoose

    muthagoose

    Jan 18, 2004
    Sweden
    No, it's not a common term in sweden :p

    I know that a G augmented chord is made up of G B D#, that's not what I'm having trouble with understanding. I'm just looking for an explanation of what a 'diad' is, something that maybe wasn't too clear in my first post :)
     
  16. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    As stated earlier, a Diad is another term for a two-note chord, also known as a double stop, an interval played harmonically and a "there-is-no-such-thing-as-a-two-note-chord" :D
     
  17. Slot

    Slot

    Oct 17, 2003
    Sydney - The Shire
    Although i'd never write it down as some kind of "chord symbol", i see nothing wrong with "g aug diad" as a term.

    The word diad isnt all that common to us bassplayers(prefering double stops), but its a fairly common term in a guitarists vocab

    Just because its a "G aug diad", it doesnt mean that you're specifying the tonality of G augmented. It'd be much more comon for a guitarist to play that particular diad over chords like Emi(maj7), A7#11, Ami7b5, Abmaj7 even something cheesey like Ebmaj(unless of course they're power-chord hacks - james bond theme)

    So although i'd never write it out, imo its perfectly legit tool for communicating a desired sound to fellow bandmembers/musicians
     
  18. Howard K

    Howard K

    Feb 14, 2002
    UK
    A "gaug" - pronounced "Gorg" - is a mythical creature existing only in hyperspace, that trawls musical discussion forums looking for arguements on which to replenlish it's evil energy. The most poplular disagreements and tension words it can sniff out several thousand links away are as follows:

    1) whether a diad is a chord or not
    2) whether you should use a pick on bass or not
    3) any mention of Flea or Fieldy combined with the words player, bass, world's and greatest
    4) differences in opinion over chord symbols, such as #11th or b5th

    The otehr real disadvantage of the Gorg is that Trolls tend to feed on it's left overs.