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HELP ME!!! Rat Fur Removal Advice Needed

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by ZuluFunk, May 6, 2018.


  1. ZuluFunk

    ZuluFunk Supporting Member

    Apr 14, 2001
    Pennsylvania
    8181318E-21D5-4DEE-9505-9D62D9F09569. E8FDCD44-C228-4B90-BE33-6B99288AD552. D7755806-3396-4FAC-B91E-666E51C3BBFE. 05FA74CE-3522-453B-9AB7-A235AC4FD975. ADD300E2-7EEC-4795-BA19-2B9A6B52505C. This week, I jumped into a project to refinish my rat-fur covered Epifani Cabinets. I started with the 410 as it was pretty gnarled, pilled, and torn.

    I thought I had all I needed. From what I read, you can generally pull it off with a heat gun for assistance and a plaster knife.

    Disasterous. The fabric pretty much disintegrated leaving nasty pulled furry patches all over the surface looking worse than Sydney Crosby’s “beard”

    I tried a razor scraper. That tended to gauge wood and get gummed up. I tried a couple of solvents. They both worked at losening the glue, but it ended up just turning the cabinet surface into a gooey layer of black swampy hairy stickiness.

    I tried a rotary palm sander. It ended up melting the fabric-glue mix, hardening it in swirls all over the cabinet. I could not sand through it because it quickly gummed up even 80-grit sandpaper pads.

    I may have to sand blast it.

    Seriously, if I don’t get a real solution to this, I’m going to try wood bondo all over the surface and just sand it smooth and laying the tolex over that.

    I’ll probably send my other cabinet out for the professionals.

    Any advice, in the meantime, is greatly appreciated.
     
  2. briandavismurph

    briandavismurph Supporting Member

    Jul 1, 2013
    Chicago
    I Would seriously consider the Herculiner Bed liner stuff. You roll it on like paint and it is tough stuff. Looks good too.
     
    tommyr01, klejst, darkestsun and 4 others like this.
  3. monkeyland

    monkeyland

    Jul 1, 2008
    Ft Myers, Florida
    Endorsing artist: Curt Mangan Strings, JH Audio
    Fire.

    Or put a plant in it.
     
  4. ZuluFunk

    ZuluFunk Supporting Member

    Apr 14, 2001
    Pennsylvania
    I was considering that. But I went with the Tolex, which I already bought.
    Getting the hair/glue residue is still the issue, regardless of the material I go with to resurface.
     
  5. mapleglo

    mapleglo Gold Supporting Member

    Sep 7, 2013
    phoenix, az
    bobba66 and FunkyD like this.
  6. ZuluFunk

    ZuluFunk Supporting Member

    Apr 14, 2001
    Pennsylvania
    Axstar likes this.
  7. mapleglo

    mapleglo Gold Supporting Member

    Sep 7, 2013
    phoenix, az
    What grit disc are you using? 60?
     
  8. ZuluFunk

    ZuluFunk Supporting Member

    Apr 14, 2001
    Pennsylvania
    80

    See above

    “I tried a rotary palm sander. It ended up melting the fabric-glue mix, hardening it in swirls all over the cabinet. I could not sand through it because it quickly gummed up even 80-grit sandpaper pads.”
     
  9. mapleglo

    mapleglo Gold Supporting Member

    Sep 7, 2013
    phoenix, az
    Hmmm, maybe a belt sander. They make 36 grit belts.
     
    spaz21387 likes this.
  10. ZuluFunk

    ZuluFunk Supporting Member

    Apr 14, 2001
    Pennsylvania
    One pass and clogged 179D5C0A-1A00-44D1-A0F6-641A8144D4A4.
     
    J-Bassomatic likes this.
  11. RichSnyder

    RichSnyder Gold Supporting Member

    Jun 19, 2003
    Columbia, Md
    Find someone with woodworking skills/tools that can build a similar cabinet or see if something exists from one of the cab suppliers. Barring that, contact Epifani and find out what glue they used to see if there are any solvents that will allow removal of the glue.
     
    byacey, Rip Van Dan and trickyric like this.
  12. mpdd

    mpdd neoconceptualist

    Mar 24, 2010
    LA
    Gotta start over I'm afraid.

    Put it back on and shave it into a hipster beard;)
     
  13. braud357

    braud357 Supporting Member

    Jul 1, 2010
    Gonzales, LA
    try some paint stripper - worked on the residue left on a cabinet I refurbished a while back
     
  14. ultra60

    ultra60 Supporting Member

    Sep 16, 2010
    Herndon/Chantilly Va.
    I'll 2nd the belt sander suggestion. I removed the rat fur from a pair of subs. Belt sander was the only thing that got it all off.
     
    Crater likes this.
  15. tr4252

    tr4252

    May 27, 2013
    If the glue gums up your sander (because of the heat generated by the friction), then maybe it's a hot melt glue. Some times in the past, I've used a heat gun in conjunction with duct tape; the tackier the better, to remove stuff like what you have on your cabinet. I'd warm up the surface, press on a length of tape, and peel it off before the thing gets a chance to cool. Worked good on contact adhesives, not sure it would be much good with all that hair, but what have you got to lose? Good luck!

    Tom
     
    NathOBX, spaz21387 and lowplaces like this.
  16. Maynjo

    Maynjo Supporting Member

    Jan 28, 2014
    Jacksonville, NC
    I agree with the fire situation. Is there a way to safely burn most of it off?
     
    nice_hat likes this.
  17. A cabinet scraper would probably do it, but it'll be pretty tedious. I've run into the problem when de-furring a cabinet, you just have to try a few different approaches until you figure out what works.

    Don't give up, you can skin this rat!
     
    mikewalker likes this.
  18. robd

    robd Supporting Member

    I'll 2nd paint stripper - worked on a couple Eden cabs I did to remove the goo. Put it on, let it soak then scrape off
     
  19. ZuluFunk

    ZuluFunk Supporting Member

    Apr 14, 2001
    Pennsylvania
    Any specific brand of paint stripper?
     
  20. Doug Parent

    Doug Parent Supporting Member

    May 31, 2004
    San Diego, Ca.
    Dealer Nordstrand Pickups.
    I stripped an Epifani 410 cab once. What a bear.
    I use a sharp chisel and a heat gun. Sometimes I have used a dremel type tool with a thin scraper blade and a heat gun blasting ahead of the vibrating blade. Heat melts the glue and the blade pushes it out of the way. You have to work in small areas at a time. Good luck. I will never do that job again.
     

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