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Kramer experts, do you know about different 700st versions? (Striker)

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by DanAdams, Mar 28, 2015.


  1. DanAdams

    DanAdams Supporting Member

    Nov 3, 2013
    Maine
    I found one of these at a pawn shop and I liked it. It seems to be a good for moding as the hardware and neck seemed good, and the pickups are standard sized. I want to know what wood the body is made from. I have done some research and there seems to be some differences throughout the years.

    1- the first ones say "KRAMER 700st" on the fender-ish headstock
    2- the next ones look the same but say "KRAMER STRIKER 700st"
    3- the later ones have an angled pointy headstock.

    I understand that the later ones have plywood bodies, but in a very old forum post someone seemed to think the older ones had some kind of hardwood bodies. do you know?
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2015
  2. Jazzcat

    Jazzcat

    Jan 20, 2009
    Titusville, FL
  3. AnalogKid4003

    AnalogKid4003

    Jul 8, 2012
    I'm curious also if these were USA made, The only identification on it is the neck plate. It says Neptune New Jersey, but it does not say "made in".
    I picked this up locally for 100 bucks, ok player. Sounds average.
    I really can't find much information on these...
    image. image. image.
     
  4. DanAdams

    DanAdams Supporting Member

    Nov 3, 2013
    Maine
    It seems like no strikers are USA made.
    based on my research the guitars were shipped to the USA from Korea and a NJ made neck plate was added there, thus misleading a lot of consumers since the 80s.
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2015
  5. bholder

    bholder Affable Sociopath Supporting Member

    Sep 2, 2001
    central NY state
    Received a gift from Sire* (see sig)
    Wow, that's, ummmm..... (oughtta be illegal! :rage:) ...cheesy, at least. Bad form. :thumbsdown:
     
  6. bholder

    bholder Affable Sociopath Supporting Member

    Sep 2, 2001
    central NY state
    Received a gift from Sire* (see sig)
    Might still be a good bass though.
     
  7. DanAdams

    DanAdams Supporting Member

    Nov 3, 2013
    Maine
    might be, but I'm not spending time or money modifying and refinishing a plywood bass.
     
    bholder likes this.
  8. bholder

    bholder Affable Sociopath Supporting Member

    Sep 2, 2001
    central NY state
    Received a gift from Sire* (see sig)
    If you remove the pickups and / or control plate, you should be able to tell whether the body is solid or plywood, might have to scratch through finish or shielding paint to see the wood.
     
  9. DanAdams

    DanAdams Supporting Member

    Nov 3, 2013
    Maine
    I didn't buy it. I don't think the pawn brokers will let me disassemble or scratch it up :) Perhaps if I get curious enough I'll go back and remove the control cover. I might be able to tell from there.
    I'm just hoping someone here will tell me something like "I sanded mine and it was [a gorgeous a high-end tone wood]"... unlikely I know. I would probably buy it even if I knew it was just basswood.
     
  10. bholder

    bholder Affable Sociopath Supporting Member

    Sep 2, 2001
    central NY state
    Received a gift from Sire* (see sig)
    Ah, yeah, I wondered about that, depends on how tolerant the pawn shop is. :) Good luck.
     
  11. GIBrat51

    GIBrat51 Innocent as the day is long Supporting Member

    Mar 5, 2013
    Lost Wages, Nevada
    Yeah, that plate is misleading, but no, it wasn't made here - it's Korean. I have several "lumie" Kramers that were, though, and they all say "Made in USA". The original Kramer factory and company HQ was in Neptune, NJ, though (along with Danelectro). According to vintagekramer.com (a very useful site) Strikers were Korean-made, beginner level basses and guitars. Some of the very early STs ( and, from that headstock picture, that isn't one of them) were rumored to have solid bodies. But, as with most Things Kramer, it can't be confirmed. 2 things, though; 1) before they were bought by Gibson and turned into a bargain basement brand, Kramer was never a bad bass or guitar; quite the opposite, in fact. The STs may sound a little "generic", but they were well made. And, 2) several layers of tone wood, properly glued together, is not the same as the pine, construction-grade plywood that your roof shingles are nailed to. That ST just might surprise you with how well it plays and sounds.:)
     
    fourstringgirl and SirMjac28 like this.
  12. SirMjac28

    SirMjac28 Patiently Waiting For The Next British Invasion

    Aug 25, 2010
    The Great Midwest
    They are well made little basses and I think they good.
     
  13. SanDiegoHarry

    SanDiegoHarry Banned Supporting Member

    Aug 11, 2008
    San Diego, CA
    Kramers stopped being "Kramers" to me when they started using wood necks (yes, I had one of the originals... lord that bass was *heavy*!)
     
  14. BassFishingInAmerica

    BassFishingInAmerica

    Jul 24, 2014
    The old Kramer's from the 80s are top notch. The best thing about them is the neck. I had one. But they are HEAVY! Don't know what the wood is. Don't think it is ply, but never looked.
     
  15. The white one is a 1988 710 and allegedly a plywood body. Plays like a dream. The neck is soooo comfortable. The black is a 2000 MusicYo Striker. Pretty good player although the '88 is better IMO. The few times I've taken the '88 out gigging it always gets compliments on it's sound. And it's looks. I added the stars myself a few years ago going for that vintage Richie Sambora look!

    2015-03-20%2021.20.54_zpsslc01k30.
     
    fretter likes this.
  16. BassFishingInAmerica

    BassFishingInAmerica

    Jul 24, 2014
    That's crazy that they decided to reverse the headstock like that.
     
    fourstringgirl likes this.
  17. AnalogKid4003

    AnalogKid4003

    Jul 8, 2012
    FWIW, I took the control plate off and my Striker is indeed a plywood body. :/ image.
     
    DanAdams likes this.
  18. DanAdams

    DanAdams Supporting Member

    Nov 3, 2013
    Maine
    Thanks everyone, but that picture seals it up for me, I'm sure they are fine basses but I don't believe it would be worth putting time into a Striker. I also had my eye on this Ibanez on eBay and I just won it. I know for sure that these are great because most of what I own is early 80s Ibanez. I'll stick with what I know and love (early 80s Roadstars and Musicians) and leave the Kramers alone.
    Screen%20Shot%202015-03-29%20at%2012.58.17%20PM.
     
  19. TRichardsbass

    TRichardsbass Banned Commercial User

    Jun 3, 2009
    Between Muscle Shoals and Nashville
    Bassgearu, Music Industry Consulting and Sales. Tech 21, NBE Corp, Sonosphere.
    First, I live near Nept une, grew up with the gang at Kramer, and until recently worked for one of the four owners of Kramer. The 700ST was in fact Korean. The earliest ones, like the one shown here with the Fender style headstock, were the next generation of the Focus series, which were made in Japan. They were not meant to be anything more then playable, discount versions. I asked two guys who worked at the plant if they remember any Strikers being solid, and none of them ever remember a solid body Korean made anything.

    I owned a Striker for a while in the 90's. Actually darn good basses for the money. Lets not forget that the Ampeg Little Stud and Big Stud were plywood, and have great sounds and great construction. However, its always best to stick with what you know and what you like.
     
    DanAdams likes this.
  20. RED J

    RED J Lol

    Jan 23, 2000
    Absolutely go for that Ibanez. I've had Striker (plyker) and they can be pretty good as plywood bodies go. With good pups they can sound really good. I can go cheap but plywood and hockey sticks are just a bit over the line.
     

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