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MXR M82 Envelope Filter vs. EHX Microsynth

Discussion in 'Effects [BG]' started by bake124, Sep 28, 2013.


  1. bake124

    bake124

    Sep 28, 2013
    Hello, all.

    I've been back and forth between purchasing one of these two pedals but I can't pull the trigger. Please help me talk it out.

    I currently run:
    Ernie Ball MusicMan Sterling (neck - single/bridge - humbucker) > Boss TU-2 > MXR Auto Q > Bass Crybaby Wah > EHX Bass Big Muff Pi > Boss Super Chorus CH-1 > Boss Digital Delay DD-7 > Ampeg BA115

    I need to replace the Auto Q because it's borrowed. I love the classic filter tones of the MXR M82 Envelope Filter but I also really dig the versatility of the Microsynth. I don't even mind spending the extra money on the Microsynth. My main concern is that the filter effects on the Microsynth won't be as "true" as the Envelope Filter. I'd hate to drop the extra cash for the Microsynth, only to have to go out later and buy the M82 anyway.

    Do any of you have any input that may help?

    Thanks much!
     
  2. Unrepresented

    Unrepresented Something Borderline Offensive

    Jul 1, 2006
    San Diego, CA
    I run both a filter and a Microsynth on my board. Depending on your use, they're likely not going to be interchangeable if that's what you're asking.
     
  3. bake124

    bake124

    Sep 28, 2013
    Essentially, that is what I'm asking. Could flatten out the sliders on the Voice Mix side of the Microsynth and use the Filter Sweep sliders to give me an Envelope Filter type sound?
     
  4. Unrepresented

    Unrepresented Something Borderline Offensive

    Jul 1, 2006
    San Diego, CA
    It's not as satisfying as a multieffects pedal IMO. It's great for what it is (one of my favorite pedals on my board for many years now), but it's not a great dedicated filter, dedicated fuzz, or dedicated octaver. It's greater than the sum of its parts, though.
     
  5. avvie

    avvie

    Oct 12, 2010
    Maui, HI
    Just because the MS has a slider that says "filter" doesn't mean that the pedal is a filter.

    EDIT: Lemme elaborate further:
    I'm having the same sort of issue because I just sold a dedicated filter (too big, it was) and I have a multi-effects unit that has many filters in it. Even THAT doesn't replace a dedicated filter because it's a small part of a greater whole and isn't very versatile. So I'm shopping for another filter. I also like synth stuff, but won't be looking to get a MS in order to have a filter.
     
  6. BooshBass

    BooshBass

    Sep 2, 2013
    Chicago, IL
    +1 definitely fun to set it for long sweeps or short quacks etc. But wouldn't use it as an octave ef or fuzz. Purely dedicated synth
     
  7. bake124

    bake124

    Sep 28, 2013
    Thanks for the input, guys.

    I'm now thinking that I might go with the M82, but also pick up the MXR M288 octave pedal that I can pair with it. I'd like to have the option to dial up some synth sounds, but I don't think I will use it enough to spend big dollars on a quality stand-alone synth pedal.

    Any thoughts on that combo? I've tried to run the Big Muff and the Auto Q together, but it sounds like s#!t no matter how much I tweak it.
     
  8. avvie

    avvie

    Oct 12, 2010
    Maui, HI
    At 6:58 endorser ed friedlander hooks that combo up:

    http://youtu.be/opKs5ZGqVpg

    That MXR octave has me questioning my OC-2, but it's still an analog pedal so I'll probably stay put. I agree with you that I don't use enough synth to justify a stand-alone pedal like the MS (which isn't all that micro, btw) but filter, dirt and octave are crucial. I'd guess that your problem withe the Big Muff and Auto Q combo isn't the Muff but the Q. The muff with an octaver in front of it could, and should, be awesome.
     
  9. bake124

    bake124

    Sep 28, 2013
    I'm also considering going really low budget and picking up a Digitech XBW Bass Synth Wah...

    Decisions, decisions...
     
  10. BooshBass

    BooshBass

    Sep 2, 2013
    Chicago, IL
    I think this is probably a good way to go for what it seems like you want to do. You can also throw a fuzz in and get even synthier. Your not going to get long synth sweeps doing this which can definitely turn heads. But spending that kind of money for that may not be worth it for you.

    Also remember, if you find something you just want to try used for a good price, chances are of you want to try it a lot of pretty people do to and you will be able to sell or here easily with little to no loss. I'm currently in a trying out kick right now and it works out well.
     
  11. BooshBass

    BooshBass

    Sep 2, 2013
    Chicago, IL
    Other, not pretty. Autocorrect
     
  12. Funkinthetrunk

    Funkinthetrunk Registered User Supporting Member

    I like pretty better.
     
  13. Phagor

    Phagor

    Mar 26, 2002
    London, UK
    Nobody's spelt it out yet, but the difference is that the BMS filter is not affected by your volume of your bass's signal, other than triggering the filter sweep when the volume goes above the trigger level. That means the sweep will always be the same speed and frequency range, whether you play loud or quiet.

    An envelope filter changes the filter frequency depending on the volume of your bass's signal, making it more dynamic and responsive.

    Of course, for synthy sounds, you might want a fixed filter response - kinda like an old monosynth with a non-velocity sensitive keyboard.
     
    blakelock likes this.
  14. BooshBass

    BooshBass

    Sep 2, 2013
    Chicago, IL
    Hah.

    Like this pretty mofo?

    [​IMG]
     
  15. alec

    alec

    Feb 13, 2000
    Perth, Australia
    Have you tried the Muff into the filter? That's the way to do it.

    I agree that the BMS is not dynamic. You'll get more mileage out of octave > fuzz > filter unless you want the specific sounds that the BMS does.
     
  16. One big distinction I want to make the OP in case it's not clearn. The EHX is not actually an envelope filter. The filter section of the BMS is a triggered filter. In an envelope filter, the cutoff of the filter follows the volume envelope of the bass signal (that is, as the bass signal comes in, the filter rises and falls with the curve of the volume of the signal.

    The EHX works differently. It has a trigger slider that sets the volume at which the filter sweep triggers. However, once it's triggered, it doesn't follow your volume envelope. It follows a fixed sweep determined by the start, stop and rate sliders.
     
    blakelock likes this.

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