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One 15 Cab +two 10" cab vrs Four 10 cab

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Green Lantern, Jan 15, 2012.


  1. Green Lantern

    Green Lantern

    Nov 3, 2011
    PA
    I was just wondering which you prefer, a 15 and two 10's, or a 4 10 cabinet? Will you really get more low end with the 15? I know the four 10 cabinet is very popular with bass players. I was thinking on gig's where I am just going through the house, I could just use the one 15 cabinet (and not carrying all the extra weight of using both cabinets. With the four 10 cabinet, you are basically stuck with always lugging a heavy bass cabinet every time.
     
  2. BogeyBass

    BogeyBass

    Sep 14, 2010
    This could be good

    Joker_popcorn.
     
  3. I Prefer 15 with 2x10 because I play reggae and old RB stuff, in addition to fast funk, but I have a two channel power amp so I can control the volume seperately. Its a fact you will get lower frequencies at higher volumes with a good 15" speaker. I have some of the low mid freqs carved out with my Crown XTI , However for years I played an eden 410XLT If you dont want to fool with that a 4x10 is the best of both worlds - and its better if you have just one channel and a nice 4ohm 4x10 cabinet. make sure its 4 ohm to get the most use out of your amp.

    If I use just one cab I take my 2x10 though - the fifteen can lack mid definition and punch if you need to cut through the mix on stage.
     
  4. BrBss

    BrBss Supporting Member

    Jul 9, 2010
    Albuquerque NM
  5. gjbassist

    gjbassist Supporting Member

    Sep 7, 2005
    Kansas City, MO
    Check the other numerous threads on this topic, but you are going to get mixed responses. Many will say to never mix speaker sizes as it might tear a hole in the space/time continuum! Others say it's quite alright. IMO it's a matter of personal taste and what sounds best to you. Two cabinets will offer more flexibility but you might want to consider doing two 2x10's or two 1x15's as well.
     
  6. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    short answer: mixing cabs "works" (no explosions, no rips in space/time, the result will likely be louder than either cab by itself), but matching cabs works better, due to matching phase response and such.

    also, it's not true that a 15 will have more bottom than a 4x10, or even a 2x10.

    a million threads on this, with a new one popping up every thirty seconds or so it seems.
     
  7. GrowlerBox

    GrowlerBox

    Feb 10, 2010
    Nude Zealand
    No it isn't. It may be a fact for your 115 compared to your 210, but it can't be generalised.
     
  8. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    i've said more than once that this sticky needs to be re-titled something more rude and eye-catching, like "4x10 on Top of 1x15 Sucks, and Here's Why!", so it stands a better chance of being read before yet another "should i put this on that?" thread gets started.
     

  9. Yeah BUT ---- that's not the OP's question. If you re-read it, then you'll see that a 410 was mentioned in the equation as an option to a 210.

    I played and still DO from time-to-time, a 210 and a 115 and they mix it up pretty good.

    Disclaimer: They aren't really compatible at higher volume levels though. The 115 sucks (consumes) as much power as the 210, but doesn't comply as well.

    Since both cabs are 8Ω, and the number of drivers is two in the 210 (natch!) and only one in the 115 (again: natch!) the power distribution is lopsided.

    But - Yes - this can be done.

    Now a 410 and a 115 with low volume exceptions, is do-able, but not the best situation.

    Remember that 'engineering science' (the same group that will chew you up for this folly) also tells us that bumblebees cannot fly.
     
  10. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    you're making my point for me!

    also, the "engineering says bumblebees can't fly" thing is an urban legend.
     
  11. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars
    Why on earth would you want a 4 ohm cab. You would have no room for expansion in the future if need be, and your volume gains would be minimal.
     
  12. Actually Walt, there is no point. If it works and doesn't emit smoke and flames, then it will work - up to a certain level.

    I''ll graciously give unto that point.

    I've prolly now poked an engineering bear, but seriously the variables involved PLUS the perceptions of what's good and what isn't, is just too nebulous.

    If one wants to nail Jello, then that's OK too - but really if it's not defending a staunch position that one has, then it's caveat emptor for using mixed cabs/drivers.

    Like I said - I know better, but a 210 and a 115 sound pretty good to me. At least MY 210 and 115 do - I cannot crystal-ball yours.

    Empirically I'm wrong. In actuality though, I sound good.
     
  13. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    nah, you're not "wrong" here, it sounds like your experience is just what is expected: the mismatched cabs "work", but can have issues in certain situations, like higher volume, where they don't play together as well as matched stuff would.
     
  14. Thanks - I needed a shoulder-chuck today.
     
  15. esa372

    esa372

    Aug 7, 2010
    Los Angeles, CA
    I would prefer two 2x10 cabs to either of the set-ups you have listed.

    Probably not.

    ...another reason for the two 2x10 cabs.
     
  16. slagbass

    slagbass

    Apr 5, 2005
    Canada
    I always think this whenever somebody says they want a 4ohm cab. Thanks for piping up.
     
  17. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    yeah, unless it's a big box like 6 or 8 tens or 2 fifteens, something you wouldn't need to add to for any normal gig.
     
  18. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars
    Yeah of course, my reply was to a suggestion of a 4 ohm 410
     
  19. Two 210 would be the ticket. As loud as a 410 (theoretically) and stands higher when stacked vertically than either options. Find and buy one 210 cab you reeeeally like now and add another one later on. Grab one for quiet gigs, grab two for louder ones.

    FYI: tone is defined by the sum of the designs of the box, not speaker sizes.
     
  20. 1n3

    1n3

    Sep 13, 2007
    USA
    Yes, an urban legend, that won't die because it's too useful to the anti-engineering narrative.
     

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