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Perfect Pitch

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by maxy, Dec 6, 2004.


  1. maxy

    maxy

    Jun 24, 2004
    Does anyone believe in this site and its product:

    http://www.perfectpitch.com

    I am planning to buy it but something seems fishy or too tedious.
     
  2. Rich600

    Rich600

    Nov 22, 2004
    Scotland
    Personally i dont believe it, i think the best method is practice on your instrument, not some disc made by some money grabbing company.
     
  3. CJK84

    CJK84

    Jan 22, 2004
    Maria Stein, OH
    Being able to develop perfect pitch is probably a ridiculous notion.

    However, the recognition of intervals can be highly beneficial in playing a pitched instrument - and a learner can develop his ear to become more proficient at recognizing intervals.

    Being able to recognize any interval - such as a minor third - is the kind of nuts and bolts skill that a bassist can benefit from.

    Save your money on the gimmicky perfect-pitch stuff and, instead, focus on developing your relative-pitch abilities.
     
  4. I agree with CJ

    Having perfect pitch will help idenitifying pitches but learning to recognize relative pitch is IMO just as good as perfect pitch

    Besides view this site and better yet it's free ( so save your money )

    http://www.good-ear.com
     
  5. Nick Gann

    Nick Gann Talkbass' Tubist in Residence

    Mar 24, 2002
    Silver Spring, MD
    Perfect pitch is a skill that can be learned, but it takes years and years to fully develop it. But, in truth, you don't really want perfect pitch. Of the people that I have talked to that do have perfect pitch, none of them truely are glad they have it. Yeah, it can be useful sometimes, but in the end, it causes more annoyance and grief than anything else. People I know that have it say that if they hear a note even slightly out of tune, it hurts, even if there is no reference note! If an ensemble is in tune with itself, but as a group is tuned to 443 or 445, they can't listen to it. Many people who have perfect pitch say that even with all of its benefits, it ends up being a curse more than a blessing.

    What every good musician needs to develop is good relative pitch. That is where its at. Notes in relation to other notes is what makes music, not the notes themselves.
     
  6. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    Nick, the 'perfect' pitch you can acquire is unlike traditional perfect pitch, in that, you don't get so sensitive that 2 cents off will give you a headache, but you get adept at recognizing and remembering pitches quickly and accurately. Just like anything it takes a lot of dedication and hard work, and because of that, most people don't 'buy into' that product. But the product is only one method of learning, it works by associating pitches with colors, so that instead of just remembering a pitch with your inner-hearing(tough to do) you remember a color(easier to do) and then when you hear a pitch you think of that color, which tells you what note it is.

    Sure, that's one way of doing it, association is a great way of learning, but it's no magic key, you still have to work hard at it.

    Acquired 'perfect' pitch *is* desirable because in the process of obtaining it your relative pitch improves greatly, and ultimately you end up with not only superior pitch recognition skills but you also improve your relativistic skills too.
     
  7. Um... no... :)

    Anyways, I'm really sure perfect pitch is something that you can learn. I was born with it, but I had to take time to perfect it through transcription.

    I say every day just pick one tone to study. I know a guitarist who spent the entire day listening to the E string on his guitar, and as soon as I played a song in E he was able to recognize it. It's all about just being able to remember the tones.

    I compare it to being color-blind. When you're color blind, you still see colors the same as a "normal" person, you just can't remember them. My color blindness is mostly blue/purple. I can tell the difference, I just can't remember which one is blue and which one is purple.
     
  8. ole Jason

    ole Jason Supporting Member

    Apr 3, 2003
    Louisville, KY
    I've always wondered what would happen if someone with perfect pitch was raised in a home with an out of tune piano. :)

    If you want to develop pitch recognition you should practice singing fixed do scales or melodies everyday.
     
  9. Nick Gann

    Nick Gann Talkbass' Tubist in Residence

    Mar 24, 2002
    Silver Spring, MD
    Oh, wow, I remembered that backwards. I just checked it online, it turns out that those whose native language is Mandarin and Vietnamese are better at it, having to do with how pitch is used in the language. My bad, I got my yes and no confused :D
     
  10. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    I met someone like that, he'd be consistently off. But at least he was consistent :meh:
     
  11. emjazz

    emjazz Supporting Member

    Feb 23, 2003
    Boston, MA
    Thank you sooooooooo much for this link! I never thought to even search the net for something like this. What a great site.
     
  12. unregistered

    unregistered unregistered

    Jun 18, 2004
  13. Jleonardbc

    Jleonardbc

    Nov 12, 2004
    Pennsylvania
    "Yeah, it can be useful sometimes, but in the end, it causes more annoyance and grief than anything else. People I know that have it say that if they hear a note even slightly out of tune, it hurts, even if there is no reference note! If an ensemble is in tune with itself, but as a group is tuned to 443 or 445, they can't listen to it. Many people who have perfect pitch say that even with all of its benefits, it ends up being a curse more than a blessing."

    I sort of agree...I have perfect pitch; I don't think it's fully developed yet, I can hum/sing certain pitches from memory at any given time and can recognize them but I have trouble sometimes with accidentals and such..? And it does hurt to hear a person/group out of tune even if they're in tune to themselves. It's sort of a blessing in that I can hear if I'm in tune when I play upright but it's also a plague in that, if I'm slightly out of tune, I know it...

    "I've always wondered what would happen if someone with perfect pitch was raised in a home with an out of tune piano. "

    We got my great-grandmother's very old (used to have the player piano mechanism but it stopped working) piano, which we had tuned but is still quite out of tune...needless to say, it bothers me, but I guess it's better than nothing.