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Put on some GHS Precision Flats today...

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by Vinnie Boombatz, Dec 15, 2017.


  1. Vinnie Boombatz

    Vinnie Boombatz Banned

    May 26, 2010
    Been going through a bit of a string search lately. Have used Chromes on different basses off and on for a few years and thought they were the best of both works since they are a pretty versatile string that works for different genres, finger style, playing with a pick etc., but have always felt they were a compromise in tone (which seems to be the case with most things that are sort of a jack of all trades, where they are good at a lot of things but don't really excel at any one particular thing, right?)

    A few months ago tried some TI Flats, and although I know I'm in the minority here, I HATED them. They felt unmatched from string to string tension-wise, and super floppy. They sounded ok I guess, but nothing life-changing, and I just couldn't see what what all the fuss was about, plus they are F@$king expensive! Went with rounds for a bit, and settled on some GHS Boomers and Fender 7250's, and really liked both of those sets, but was still hoping to find a nice flatwound string I liked.

    Got some GHS Precision Flats today and put them on a 2008 American Standard Precision. Coming from Chromes, these sound sort of broken in already out of the package, and love the feel and tension from string to string I can't really tell much as far as if they are more of less tension compared to the Chromes (but I went from light Chromes to medium GHS Precision Flats), and think the GHS flats feel great, and nothing like the TI Jazz Flats that felt like floppy mis-matched rubber bands that someone just whipped together from several random sets they had sitting around. Soundwise I REALLY like them. Deep, thump but not a dead thud, STRONG fundamental, and man, at around $24 and change for a set, they are a screaming deal if you ask me. I bought two sets just in case I loved them, and I do, so I'll be putting the other set on my Classic 50's P this weekend. Probably makes more sense to put rounds on one and fits on the other, but the stuff I play currently, which is in a old school/Outlaw country cover band works well with a P and flats.

    If you're looking for a flatwound string that's easy playing and great feeling that won't give you sticker shock I really can't see how you wouldn't like these strings.

    w9hfVtr.
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2017
  2. dagrev

    dagrev Supporting Member

    Jun 21, 2006
    Kentucky
    They are indeed a very nice old school thump string. Maybe not right for every bass/situation--but perfect for a good number.

    Strings are an odd thing. I love some strings until I play through a different cab and the love goes away. It's a big matching game.

    GHS Precision Flats thread
     
  3. Vinnie Boombatz

    Vinnie Boombatz Banned

    May 26, 2010
    I'm a big fan of John Stirratt of Wilco, and he has a pretty thumpy tone, but he still cuts through and is easily heard (and usually plays Jazz basses mostly on the neck pickup and I think he may use Pyramid flats), and feel like I am getting something similar with these strings. I play through a Fender Rumble 500 V3, and also have an Ampeg SCR-DI and can get some really nice fat, but still defined and thumpy tones.

    It would probably make more sense to put rounds on the American Standard and flats on the Classic 50's, but I just like the feel and narrower nut with on the American Standard and reach for it more often, but flats on the Classic 50's with the PV '63 pickup would be monster!
     
    Pbassmanca likes this.
  4. GHS P Flats have become my go to flat. I don't play much else other than tapes or flats but I have really liked them over La Bella or Chromes.

    They just seem to be well balanced and tonally perfect even in short scale.y I've experimented between the 2 and I really love D'Addario black tapes on a long scale p/j pickup setup and the P flats on a short scale single coil. Usually because the GHS are almost always available in short scale. But more so because they are a very traditional flat and perform well short scale.
     
    Pbassmanca and nerkoids like this.
  5. trothwell

    trothwell

    Apr 9, 2008
    If you like them on day one, just wait a few months! :) Or a few years!
     
  6. Linnin

    Linnin SUSPENDED

    Jul 19, 2012
    Linningrad, Earth
    Roughly 100 playing hours to get them well broken in and at six months the mojo really shines. My set has been on 5 years and they are perfect. I'll never take them off.
     
    Pbassmanca and armybass like this.
  7. Linnin

    Linnin SUSPENDED

    Jul 19, 2012
    Linningrad, Earth
    The Bass Love Is Unconditional. Why Wait?
     
    Pbassmanca likes this.
  8. Vinnie Boombatz

    Vinnie Boombatz Banned

    May 26, 2010
    UPDATE: I tried out the GHS Precision flats at band practice today and did not like them. I have read that the D and G strings can be a bit bright compared to the others when they are new and apparently calm down and mellow out over time. I actually thought the A, D & G strings sounded great, but the E string just sounded completely dead. No thump, just thud and died out almost instantly with not even a hint of sustain, while the other strings sounded pretty darn good. Was bugging me the entire practice. We play a mix of old school country and more modern alt-country covers along the lines of Steve Earle, Wilco, John Prine, Waylon Jennings, etc., so I thought these strings would be great, but I'm going to go back to the Chromes for the next rehearsal and see how it goes.

    I wil check that the string isn't twisted or anything, and it is wound all the way down on the post, and I even put a little bend on the end of the strings before cutting them with wire cutters when I install them, something I don't think you really need to do with hex-core strings, but something I discovered with round core guitar strings, so it's just something I do all the time now.
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2017
    petrus61 likes this.
  9. Yahboy

    Yahboy

    May 21, 2008
    My opinion with M3050 is similiar to you.
    You should give a try with Labella LTF4A.
     
  10. Linnin

    Linnin SUSPENDED

    Jul 19, 2012
    Linningrad, Earth
    90 Days. You need to play the E in at least 90 days or 90 to 100 playing hours. The entire set comes into it's own at six months. Patience.
     
    Yahboy likes this.
  11. Vinnie Boombatz

    Vinnie Boombatz Banned

    May 26, 2010
    uGtqMcl.
     
  12. Linnin

    Linnin SUSPENDED

    Jul 19, 2012
    Linningrad, Earth
    It's your money $$$
    I like tone better.
     
  13. sheltjo6

    sheltjo6 Supporting Member

    Jun 10, 2012
    California
    Keep us posted. Some players love them, others hate them.

    These strings are on my list of flat wounds to try along with GHS pressure wounds. Not sure which set I want to try first.
     
  14. Vinnie Boombatz

    Vinnie Boombatz Banned

    May 26, 2010
    Well, after getting home and unpacking my gear and whatnot, I plugged the bass into the same amp I was using for rehearsal, a Fender Rumble 500 V3, and the bass sounds fine, just like I thought it did when I first put the strings on the other day. E and A string sound similar in tone but still a little dead, but both have decent sustain, while the D & G are a quite a bit brighter and livelier, which I know are characteristic of these two strings until they calm down. Go figure. Guess Ill just keep these strings on and see what happens again at the next rehearsal.
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2017
    Pbassmanca, TN WOODMAN and Linnin like this.
  15. Linnin

    Linnin SUSPENDED

    Jul 19, 2012
    Linningrad, Earth
    Six Months. Six. Months. Then Joy Arrives. Not Before.
     
  16. Vinnie Boombatz

    Vinnie Boombatz Banned

    May 26, 2010
    I'll try. And I have another P with rounds that I can pickup now and then if I just can't stand it. But did a little more messing around, and even after screwing with the pickup heights and whatnot the low E still has something different about it than the other strings.

    So why do you say keep waiting? Am I waiting for the other 3 strings to sound as crappy as the low E?! Or is there some sort of magic that happens when they get older? I just don't get it why you should have to wait. I mean, if the low E sounds like ass, it's not like it's going to magically wake up and sound better over time.
     
    Pbassmanca likes this.
  17. Linnin

    Linnin SUSPENDED

    Jul 19, 2012
    Linningrad, Earth
    Yes. It does.
    Yes. Magic happens. Some call it mojo. Others, juju.

    It does! And it will!
     
    Pbassmanca and TN WOODMAN like this.
  18. Vinnie Boombatz

    Vinnie Boombatz Banned

    May 26, 2010
    Haha. You're nuts! :bassist:
     
    Pbassmanca and Linnin like this.
  19. fourstringdrums

    fourstringdrums Decidedly Indecisive Supporting Member

    Oct 20, 2002
    Massachusetts
    GHS Precision Flats were the first string that I put on that made me go "THERE IT IS!" But after trying those, Chromes, Labellas, TI, DR Flats... They're to me the darkest of the bunch. Definitely an old school flat. I like Labella next, specifically the low tensions, as they have more mids, and are really really smooth. Chromes are ok. They're the brightest, but nothing special IMO. DR's are very similar to the Labella. Right now I'm trying out TI's and I think they may be what I'm looking for. I'm appreciating lower tension due to some hand pain and weakness, and I'm in "I want the fell and tone of flats, but still want some of the grit that round wounds have." I think I found them with the TI's.
     
    armybass and R&B like this.

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