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Tone wood

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by doomprophet8, Oct 12, 2019.


  1. Hi guys. I am onto having a custome bass and searched alot about the woods ,
    All I need is a punchy , sharp and agressive sound with attacks for progressive metal . This is my taste of sound not only the lows , I love the high mids and agressive attacks like dingwall basses .
    So what kind of wood I should choose for the body and the top ????
    I have chosen alder . If I am wrong please tell me . Thank u all .
     
    Matt R, nilorius and Vinny_G like this.
  2. Volker Kirstein

    Volker Kirstein Supporting Member

    Punchy? Sharp? Aggressive? Might I suggest a glossy maple fretboard? That hard, laquered surface meets those needs quite well. While it's true that maple is "softer" than rosewood, the thick layer of hard laquer on the finish, in conjunction with the (alleged) tonal qualities of maple, make it an ideal fretboard for hard, aggressive, punchy playing.

    If a darker wood is your thing, perhaps ebony.

    The key thing being the hardness of the fretboard. A rosewood fretboard with a thick layer of hard laquer will do just as well.

    As for the body, Alder is fine.

    Also keep in mind that the wood of the fretboard, neck, and body contribute only a small portion of the overall sound from a solid body electric instrument, and then only in the form of those tiny incremental steps above the "95% of the way to your sound" mark. Strings, pickups/electronics, amplification, and playing style contribute far more.
     
    Dunyet, TH63, MovinTarget and 12 others like this.
  3.  
  4. Thank Volker for ur info . I have chosen ebony for fretboard and as u said this is a good decision . For the neck I have chosen 5ply maple/wenge neck . And an alder body. For sure these are the 5% of the tone.
    One question: should I choose a top on the alder body ? For example maple top makes it a better or it would sounds better without any tops ???!!!
     
  5. Thank Volker for ur info . I have chosen ebony for fretboard and as u said this is a good decision . For the neck I have chosen 5ply maple/wenge neck . And an alder body. For sure these are the 5% of the tone.
    One question: should I choose a top on the alder body ? For example maple top makes it a better or it would sounds better without any tops ???!!!
     
  6. Vinny_G

    Vinny_G

    Dec 1, 2011
    Gallia Celtica
    Hello, welcome to TalkBass :)
    I'm sorry I can't help you, I'm here just to watch.
     
    gumbynotpokey, bbh, Bob_Ross and 2 others like this.
  7. 92aceshigh

    92aceshigh

    Feb 11, 2017
    Brighton, UK
    I love these threads.

    popcorn.
     
  8. chadds

    chadds

    Mar 18, 2000
    Too many laminations and you have the sound of glue it’s been said. :)
     
    Ellery, BassikBrad, Chrisk-K and 4 others like this.
  9. U mean the solid wood is better for the neck? But multiple woods have some advantages such as more strength in the neck.
    And last question : the top wood is effective in the tone ? Or it is only for the appearance and beauty?
     
  10. charlie monroe

    charlie monroe Gold Supporting Member

    Feb 14, 2011
    Buffalo, NY
    Solid alder. Paint it black.
     
    Luigir, gumbynotpokey, fhm555 and 3 others like this.
  11. chadds

    chadds

    Mar 18, 2000
    That was said in the ‘80s when there where these multi laminated coffee table basses that didn’t resonate. You want a stiff neck whether it’s the wood like maple or something making it rigid like graphite bars or another wood. Ask the builder why for any combination.
     
    basicly6 and doomprophet8 like this.
  12. Specially a satine black with an ebony fingerboard looks sexy
     
    RodRy and charlie monroe like this.
  13. Vinny_G

    Vinny_G

    Dec 1, 2011
    Gallia Celtica
    Which players do you like the sound of?
     
    doomprophet8 likes this.
  14. Alder body for all purposes. Simple.
     
    doomprophet8 likes this.
  15. Adam nolly of periphery, marisuz duda of Riverside , Justin chanceller of tool
     
  16. TheReceder

    TheReceder

    Jul 12, 2010
    Mn.
    This is the typical tonewood... is bs vs tone woods matters video... posted it not so much because it really matters... more because it illustrates how stupid I may look when I put my pick in my mouth.(7:23)

    Guess I won't me doing that anymore... I do think that having a little spittle on my pick gives a little warmer tone to my A and E string... not sure it's really a perceptible difference on the D and G.

     
    RodRy, Dunyet, Roffa and 3 others like this.
  17. JRA

    JRA my words = opinion Supporting Member

    if these weren't 'too pricey' i'd get a fretless version for myself...and play some metal! :D

    note the tonewoods:
     
  18. Vinny_G

    Vinny_G

    Dec 1, 2011
    Gallia Celtica
    The basses they play are rather different, so I think it will be fine, whatever wood you choose, provided you have powerful pickups and a versatile preamp.
     
    RodRy likes this.
  19. bearfoot

    bearfoot

    Jan 27, 2005
    Chittenango, NY
    [​IMG]
     
  20. AGCurry

    AGCurry Supporting Member

    Jun 29, 2005
    St. Louis
    I'm going to try a serious answer, even though this is a subject that causes much eye rolling, usually justified.

    As has been pointed out, the woods in a solid-body instrument don't affect tone nearly as much as other factors. However, the most-pointed attack and greatest sustain result from materials which do NOT resonate with the strings. You would want materials which do not absorb vibrations. Furthermore, "tone" can be affected by which frequencies the neck and body absorb.
    Because necks are subject to much more flexing than bodies, a stiff neck is your first consideration. After that, any stiff-wooded body should be fine.
     

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