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Why does my amp have a separate effects input and output

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Bassistcali, Jun 2, 2014.


  1. Bassistcali

    Bassistcali

    Nov 10, 2013
    So I just picked up one of the old trace Elliot 1001 commando bass amp and I'm confused on how to use a pedal with it... It has a separate effects inputs that say return and send....anyone know how to use it?also has a line out input if anyone can tell me what thats for as well..sorry new to this
     

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  2. M0ses

    M0ses

    Sep 11, 2009
    Los Angeles
    It's an effects loop. Practically all pedals are designed to be run in front of your amp's input: rackmount gear is often better utilized within that loop on the back.
    If you want to use the loop, you plug a lead from the Send on the amp to the input of the first thing in the chain, then than output of the last thing in the chain goes to Return. You can also, in most cases, just plug something into the Return to bypass the preamp.
     
  3. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    My advice...ignore it. I've never met an amp effect loop that I liked. Without exception, every pedal I've run into one either sounds no better than running in line, or it sounds worse.
     
  4. lz4005

    lz4005

    Oct 22, 2013
    Two of the three things you're talking about are outputs, not inputs.
     
  5. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    Oh yeah, the line out. That's if you want to run two amps. You can also run a tuner out from it if you don't want it in the path from bass to amp.
     
  6. Most pedals are best run into the input of the amp.

    The only exception I can think of off the top of my head is a volume pedal.
     
  7. Bassistcali

    Bassistcali

    Nov 10, 2013
    Yeah this is were I get confused...the signal goes through from my bass to my amp but I can't hear the pedals...
     
  8. FretNoMore

    FretNoMore * Cooking with GAS *

    Jan 25, 2002
    The frozen north
    How have you connected the pedals now?
     
  9. Bassistcali

    Bassistcali

    Nov 10, 2013
    Amp's main input>wah>bass
     
  10. FretNoMore

    FretNoMore * Cooking with GAS *

    Jan 25, 2002
    The frozen north
    Looks OK, though I'd change the arrows around to get the direction and what's inputs and outputs right: Bass -> Wah -> Amp.

    What do you mean then when you wrote you can't hear the pedals?
     
  11. Bassistcali

    Bassistcali

    Nov 10, 2013
    Oh yeah :confused: so its just bypassed I meant but It shouldn't be
     
  12. arai

    arai Banned

    Jul 16, 2007
    OP.
    The send goes to your effect in and the return goes to your effect out.
    The signal from the send sends is a line level signal so it can sound different then it would if you run the effect from your bass>effects>amp. because of impedance differences.
    One thing to consider is if you run different basses with the effects between the basses and amp the effect will sound different because every bass has different levels of gain or impedance affecting the effect response, so if you run some effect through the send and return you can get a more predictable result

    By input I am sure he means and which I understand it to be, is an input is where you insert the jack. Insert = input. Nothing to do with signal flow.
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2014
  13. FretNoMore

    FretNoMore * Cooking with GAS *

    Jan 25, 2002
    The frozen north
    Maybe clear to most, but as a lot of people do get this wrong I think it is better to call the jack on the bass an output and the (input) jack on the amp an input. That, plus realizing a cable transports a signal from an output jack to an input jack, and there is less confusion.
     
  14. It's just another routing option. Puts your effects between the pre amp and power amp instead of in front of the amp. I've never really used them on any amp or preamp I've owned. I prefer to run all my effects in front of my pre.

    There are a couple different types of effects loops. Series the most common, parallel basically it like running all your effects with a blend pedal set on 50%. The third is when the loop is selectable between the two for example my sans amp RBI has a loop that is selectable.
     
  15. the low one

    the low one

    Feb 21, 2002
    UK
    The commando is a great little amp. Been using one for almost 20 years and all I've needed to do is replace the top handle a couple of times.
    I've used the line out once and the sound guy liked it but i use an external DI mostly.
    As been said you rarely use the effects loop but the send makes a good tuner out.
     
  16. arai

    arai Banned

    Jul 16, 2007
    Yes, it is a bit confusing but I guess sharing knowledge and educating each other is what is great about forums
     
  17. dincz

    dincz

    Sep 25, 2010
    Czech Republic
    According to that logic, no gear has an output.
     
  18. arai

    arai Banned

    Jul 16, 2007
    Mind=blown ;)
     
  19. Bob Lee (QSC)

    Bob Lee (QSC) In case you missed it, I work for QSC Audio! Commercial User

    Jul 3, 2001
    Costa Mesa, Calif.
    Technical Communications Developer, QSC Audio
    If your effects or processors are meant to use line-level signals, then insert them into the effects loop. If they're meant for instrument levels insert them between the bass and the preamp input.
     
  20. lz4005

    lz4005

    Oct 22, 2013
    I can't tell you the number of times I've "fixed" someone's rig during sound check by showing them they've reversed the input/output jacks on a pedal or some other piece of gear. After letting them sweat for 15 minutes or so with no sound coming out.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2014
    Sartori likes this.

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