4ohm Amp into four 8ohm cabs?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by bassdude123, Aug 2, 2021.


  1. bassdude123

    bassdude123

    Aug 2, 2021
    Hi everyone,

    I just bought the „Trickfish Bullhead 1k“ which is rated @4Ohm.

    Now to the cabs:

    Out of logistical reasons i thought about getting:
    2x 110 instead of 210
    2x 112 instead of 212
    —-> this would be 4 8Ohm cabs

    Is it possible to use 4 8Ohm cabs with the 4Ohm amp?
    What are the downsides?


    Im looking foreward to some replies :D
    bassdude123
     
  2. Wasnex

    Wasnex

    Dec 25, 2011
    All four in parallel will be 2 ohms, which is below the amps minimum rating and should be avoided.

    If you rig up cables that wire all four cabs in in series parallel, the impedance will be 8 ohms.

    Two cabs in series (8+8= 16ohms). You will have two series circuits at 8 ohms. Put both circuits in parallel and your back to 8 ohms (16/2=8). ​
     
  3. bassdude123

    bassdude123

    Aug 2, 2021
    Okay, can you tell me how much percentage of the power each cab would get?
    Thx for the fast answer ;)
     
  4. Wasnex

    Wasnex

    Dec 25, 2011
    With four 8 ohm cabs in series/parallel, each cab will get 25% of the total power. The Bullhead 1K is rated for 1,000W at both 4 ohms and 8 ohms, so each cab will receive a max of 250W when the amp is producing its rated power.


    If you had an amp that was rated for 2 ohms, four 8 ohm cabs in parallel would also share the power equally.
     
    MCF, seang15, bassically_eli and 5 others like this.
  5. bassdude123

    bassdude123

    Aug 2, 2021
    I see.
    Thank you very much :)
     
    Wasnex likes this.
  6. Great answers. There is the further thought that if you are combining identical drivers, then you will get an even spread of power, however when speakers of different impendences are paralleled together, the lower impedance driver will get more power... electricity always heads for the path of least resistance. This page explains that and a whole lot of related questions in a really approachable way, for my thoughs... https://geoffthegreygeek.com/multiple-speakers-share-power/
     
  7. mmbongo

    mmbongo Regular Human Bartender Supporting Member

    Aug 5, 2009
    Carolinas
    Also remember that 1000 watts is the ‘maximum’ rating of that tamp with the actual power being around 750 watts.

    Trying to do a series/parallel thing is going to reduce power as well. The simple fix is to get two 8 ohm cabinets.
     
    johnnynitro, noahw1, dbsfgyd1 and 7 others like this.
  8. bassdude123

    bassdude123

    Aug 2, 2021
    Yes i do not mind losing some power as i am getting portability in return.

    As long as i am loud enough:
    I play with 2 guitars, vocals and drums...
    We are loud but no deafening metal here xD
    The greatist gig without PA support would be 100people indoor

    Do you think it will be still enough?
     
  9. Wasnex

    Wasnex

    Dec 25, 2011

    The specs say the amp produces the same power (1,000W) at either 4 or 8 ohms.

    When you hold the power constant and double the speakers, you net +3dB from mutual coupling. This assumes identical speakers.

    If you have two speakers at 4 ohms, each cab sees 500W. If you have four speakers at 8 ohms, each cab sees 250W. Cutting the power each speaker sees in half drops the SPL each cab makes by -3dB. However doubling the speakers gives you +6dB from mutual coupling. So -3+6=+3dB net.

    The mutual coupling occurs only where the distance between drivers is within about 1/4 wavelength. In other words, you get more lows.
     
  10. bassdude123

    bassdude123

    Aug 2, 2021
    Okay i see, unlike most other amps, this has the same wattage @4Ohm and @8Ohm. :eyebrow:

    Another question:
    As i dont want to buy all four cabs at once, more likely start off with just one of the 110s.... is there anything to keep in mind? (Cab has 300W, Amp has 1000Wpeak)
     
  11. Wasnex

    Wasnex

    Dec 25, 2011

    I suggest you try the cabs you are considering, choose the one you like best and plan to buy that cab only.

    The idea is identical cabs will work with each other, because each cab has the exact some tuning. If you go with dissimilar cabs, the tuning may be different enough that they fight with each other rather than playing well together, and it does not matter whether you are mixing 15s, 12s, and 10s, or dissimilar 10s. The incompatibility relates to group delay and phase variances that occur around the port tuning frequency.

    From what I have read, the group delay variances have more of an impact than phase variances. A good engineer can design 10s, 12s, and 15's that will all work well together, but just because two cabs are in the same product line does not guarantee that the engineering has been done.

    Of course if if you can try both types of cabs together, then you can determine their compatibility before you buy.

    As far as what to look for: The sensitivity ratings should be as close as possible. Higher sensitivity ratings are better, as you can make more volume with less power.

    Keep in mind that if you use only two cabs, then each cab will see up to 500W. If you use one cab, 1000W will be available to it :eek:. Not a lot of 112 or 110 cabs can handle even 500W. So you probably want the highest power handling you can get if you plan to push the amp hard. Honestly, unless their is a specific need for really small cabs, the smallest I would go is 210s or 212s. I think it would be too easy to blow a 110 or 112 with this amp.
     
    herndonbassist, lomo and bassdude123 like this.
  12. bassdude123

    bassdude123

    Aug 2, 2021
    I would use two exact same 110s.
    Do you also see the potential of any tuning problems with the exact same model?
     
  13. JeezyMcNuggles

    JeezyMcNuggles Supporting Member

    Feb 23, 2018
    Santa Maria, CA
    I suck, but nobody really notices
    The amp is 4 ohm minimum. You can run it at anything higher.

    The downside is 2/3 power each time you double the impedance. The plus side is, that really doesn't mean anything volume wise.
     
  14. bassdude123

    bassdude123

    Aug 2, 2021
    It is rated 1000W peak @8ohm
    So probably even more @4ohm

    Less power means less air moving? :cautious:
     
  15. JeezyMcNuggles

    JeezyMcNuggles Supporting Member

    Feb 23, 2018
    Santa Maria, CA
    I suck, but nobody really notices
    Yes, because power cords move air when you plug them in.
     
    bassdude123 likes this.
  16. JeezyMcNuggles

    JeezyMcNuggles Supporting Member

    Feb 23, 2018
    Santa Maria, CA
    I suck, but nobody really notices
    So, it runs at 500 - 250w @ 8ohm

    Depending on whether they state their "program" power as "peak" or not. Some double rms as "program", Peavey. Some double rms as "peak", ampeg. Others double program as peak, behringer.

    If the peak is program, it's twice rms (which is its constant power rating). If the peak is peak, it's 4 times the rms (which is the constant power rating).
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2021
  17. bassdude123

    bassdude123

    Aug 2, 2021
    But it is rated 1000 peak @8ohm
     
    JeezyMcNuggles likes this.
  18. JeezyMcNuggles

    JeezyMcNuggles Supporting Member

    Feb 23, 2018
    Santa Maria, CA
    I suck, but nobody really notices
    You're right. I can't argue with black and white printed truth.
     
  19. JeezyMcNuggles

    JeezyMcNuggles Supporting Member

    Feb 23, 2018
    Santa Maria, CA
    I suck, but nobody really notices
    Although, what most people don't realize, is that's actually really loud. Like, it's really more than you need.
     
    HolmeBass, lomo and bassdude123 like this.
  20. bassdude123

    bassdude123

    Aug 2, 2021
    I see, thats crazyy :smug:
     
  21. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
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