1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  
     
    TalkBass.com has been uniting the low end since 1998.  Join us! :)

Advice on experimental (and crude) repair

Discussion in 'Setup & Repair [DB]' started by Saxophone Phil, Jul 4, 2018.


  1. An overlaid soundpost would be appropriate and acoustically invisible if done well. It will be critical that you set the grain of the patch at least 45 degrees offset from the top grain.
     
    dhergert likes this.
  2. Saxophone Phil

    Saxophone Phil

    Jul 4, 2018
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    owner of 1959 Guitar Co.
    Is 45 degrees ideal? Would 90 be better? Sounds like this is the way to go.

    dhergert - the goal is to take a bass that has been officially condemned by a luthier and turn it into a playable instrument. So sound quality is important, appearance is not - but laying in a patch like this has the advantage of not looking ugly.
     
    dhergert likes this.
  3. At 45 degrees the belly and patch will move roughly in sync. At 90 maybe not but I’ve done so successfully.
     
  4. Steven Ayres

    Steven Ayres Supporting Member

    Mar 11, 2007
    Northern Arizona
    That's essentially what I was describing above, and it's a common repair.
     
  5. robobass

    robobass

    Aug 1, 2005
    Cologne, Germany
    Private Inventor - Bass Capos
    45°? I thought the common practice was to rotate only a few degrees. More rotation gives more strength, in a sense, but what about shrinkage? Also, less rotation means less interference with the top vibrations.
     
    DoubleMIDI likes this.
  6. robobass

    robobass

    Aug 1, 2005
    Cologne, Germany
    Private Inventor - Bass Capos
    Thinking about it more, the patch will have almost all of its stiffness along the grain. I really think you want to rotate it only as much as needed to prevent the cracks from pulling the grain of the patch apart. 5°? 10°?
     
  7. Saxophone Phil

    Saxophone Phil

    Jul 4, 2018
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    owner of 1959 Guitar Co.
    I think robobass has got it there - it seems to me that somewhere around 5° or 10° will be the best compromise between the strength of the repair and maintaining the natural movement of the wood. Anyone have a good reason to use a greater angle?

    I've ordered a new bridge and strings (things take forever to arrive in New Zealand), and I'll begin as soon as they arrive. The first job though, is to dismantle a piano to get the spruce for the repair!

    FWIW I've given her a name - she's "the Bride". As in the Bride of Frankenstein (she's being brought back to life, she'll have scars and bolts in her neck). Also references to Duchamp and Tarrantino.
     
  8. Given where you live and what was filmed there, I say call her "Bride of the Dunedain." And inlay a big golden ring in the tailpiece.
     
  9. Saxophone Phil

    Saxophone Phil

    Jul 4, 2018
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    owner of 1959 Guitar Co.
    Ha ha! (but people down here in Dunedin would probably just think I spelled Dunedin wrong).
     
  10. Saxophone Phil

    Saxophone Phil

    Jul 4, 2018
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    owner of 1959 Guitar Co.
    Thanks for all the help I got here on this project - in the end she turned out beautifully - after around 50 or 60 hours of work. Here's the tale in detail...
     

Share This Page