Dismiss Notice

Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

Audio Technica Pro35x

Discussion in 'Amps, Mics & Pickups [DB]' started by free4all, Aug 23, 2005.


  1. free4all

    free4all

    Apr 27, 2004
    Hello,

    I just purchased an Audio Technica Pro35x. I hadn't had the chance to hear this mic before but I bought it after reading some positive comments about it. Plus some of the big boys use it. I read, on an old Bass Player issue, that Scott Colley is one of them. The only problem I'm having is trying to find a spot where to attach the little spring clamp. Can anyone help with this? I attached an image with measurements.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Phil Smith

    Phil Smith Mr Sumisu 2 U

    May 30, 2000
    Peoples Republic of Brooklyn
    Creator of: iGigBook for Android/iOS
    I've gotten good results attaching the clip to the tailpiece.
     
  3. Nivaca

    Nivaca

    Jan 8, 2005
    I've always wanted to buy that mic, but the way it's plugged makes me wonder (at the manufacturer's page says it needs a 4-pin wireless adapter or something like it).
    I'm looking for a standard XLR plug (if it's condenser, it needs the phantom).

    How do you plug it the amp?
     
  4. Jeremy Allen

    Jeremy Allen Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 18, 2002
    Bloomington, IN
    I attach it to the edge of my treble-side bridge adjuster and position the microphone about half an inch above (or closer) to the top of the bass, directly in-between the feet of the bridge but closer to the neck (maybe a couple of inches "north" of the bridge). I imagine sweet spots will be different on every bass, but this is a great recording set-up for me. (It's not quite as effective live--some notes really ring out and others disappear, but as I said this positioning works very well in the studio for me.)
     
  5. I have an ATM-35, which is basically the same at the Pro35 - here's a picture of how I mount it on the bass -

    Very easy to set up, and it comes with a small box which can contain a 9V battery, or it can use phantom power via the XLR on the box. The cable from the mic to the box is very skinny and has its own miniature 3-pin connector.

    - Wil
     
  6. Nivaca

    Nivaca

    Jan 8, 2005
    Will, what kind of pickup are you using? I can't recognize it in the pic.
     
  7. Nivaca

    Nivaca

    Jan 8, 2005
    For the ATM35, I found only 4-pin Hirose type connector. Is this convertible easily to XLR?
     
  8. I've been A/B ing mics for recording. I haven't tried the ATM35 or Pro 35. I like the fact that it's clip on. I've found little difference in cardioid mics under $500. Actually they all sound good. A $2000 mic in isolation probably can't be beat, but would this be your cardioid mic of choice? My favorites so far are Sennheisers. I tried on old 441 & another old shotgun that's not made anymore.
     
  9. Fishman Full Circle - (provides a nice mount for the ATM-35 also :) )

    - Wil
     
  10. Jeremy Allen

    Jeremy Allen Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 18, 2002
    Bloomington, IN
    No--but it's the one I have on hand, so I use it! I've actually had it sitting around unused for years, and then I went into a budget studio and this was what they put on my bass. The recording came out great, and now I use it quite a bit. Especially for live shows where someone wants to make a recording with a good bass sound but little bleed--I just clip it on, point it right at the top of the bass (not into the F-holes--that may work for some people, but in general I think it's a myth--that's not where the sound comes from!), and let the recording guy plug it into his mixer.
     
  11. Thanks for answer Johono5! I can't explain it, but some of the best live recorded sounds I've had were from (inexpensive) cardioid or directional mics pointed directly at the bridge, about 3 to 8 inches back. It can sound better than my axe amplified. Overall I don't think mics work well amplified, but are great for recording.
    I'll give the 35 a try and leave my feedback!!!
     
  12. larry

    larry Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2004
    Florida
    I use a similar mic, the Shure Beta 98 H/C:
    http://www.shure.com/microphones/models/beta98h.asp

    It has the same clamp. I put mine on the tip of the bridge between the D & G strings and put the mic about an inch off the top of the bass just above the bridge leg, maybe slightly toward the f-hole on the G side.

    It would be interesting to compare them. Assuming the mic gets a good sound, the next important things are minimizing bleed from other sources (though I think that is more of a function of how loud your bass is and how hard you pull the strings; it's the ratio of how loud your bass is compared to the sound around it at the point where the mic is) and how natural sounding the bleed is (off-axis coloration). If there is little off-axis coloration, you don't really hear the bleed as much.

    These little clip-on mics are the way to go. It's easy to get the mic closer to the bass where there will be more bass sound vs. other instruments. I'm using mine WAY more now that I have my LaScala. :cool:
     
  13. larry

    larry Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2004
    Florida
  14. Jason Hollar

    Jason Hollar Supporting Member

    Apr 17, 2005
    Pittsburgh area
    I just got an older AT 35 "R".

    I haven't found a secure place to clip it either...without the possibility of it scooting around or falling off...THUNK!

    I also have the Fishman Full circle...but it doesn't fit all that well.

    Does anyone make a larger adjuster wheel? I could see replacing the non-pickup wheel for a better place to clamp the mic.
     
  15. greg garrison

    greg garrison

    Apr 12, 2005
    Colorado
    I clip my ATM-35 to the bottom of the E string side adjuster, and position the mic right between the bridge feet, about 1 inch from the top, and angled slightly upward toward the fingerboard. Sounds great, and has never fallen off during a show. I have the standard aluminum adjusters. I've gotten many comments on the naturalness and evenness (are those even words?) of the sound, and most soundmen I've worked with live love the setup- some have tried high $$ condensers first, only to go with the ATM after hearing it.
     
  16. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    Try mounting a small "L" bracket onto either bridge leg with a nylon Cable Tie. You can buy a ****load of 'em at Radio Shack for a few bucks, they're easily removeable, and they sell 'em in black. The L bracket would be a perfect place to mount the mic clip, and you could wrap some felt around the bracket if there was any rattling. HTH!
     
  17. Jason Hollar

    Jason Hollar Supporting Member

    Apr 17, 2005
    Pittsburgh area
    Sleepy Argonaut? Is that like one of the Seven Dwarves meets an ancient Greek team of heroes??? More like Grouchy since I've been fooling around with this mic!

    Thanks for the advice though...

    Greg -- good to see you on TB...I'm a fan from back in Colorado!

    Cheers.
     
  18. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    Sorry: JASON and the Argonauts + Sleepy HOLLER

    Stupid, I know, but the best I could do on short notice...:bag:
     
  19. Jason Hollar

    Jason Hollar Supporting Member

    Apr 17, 2005
    Pittsburgh area
    Greg --

    I know of you through some of the Northern Colorado jazz guys like Mark Sloniker & Mark Raynes, etc. I also know you played with Leftover Salmon for a while.

    Question about the mic & the upright:

    When you said the sound guys prefer this mic -- do you send them the mic directly for the house only...or do you run it through your stage rig...then back out to the house as well?

    I haven't used this mic at a jazz gig yet -- but even at home with my amp, it's kind of prone to feed back at moderate volumes.

    I've seen LS before...may have even seen you play with them...did you ever use the upright on that gig...or was it mostly electric?

    I'm just inquiring to find out what other players have found when using this mic on the job.

    That being said, I'd really like to try a Solstace or some other blender through my current amp or even a two-channel Acoustic Image head/combo sometime to see how the mic reacts. I'd love to be able to blend it in with either my Full Circle or Barbera p/u.

    Thanks!
     
  20. greg garrison

    greg garrison

    Apr 12, 2005
    Colorado
    jason-
    hey, did we ever meet? So, as far as my experiences- I have used the mic with a pickup (realist or underwood) thru a Solstice and my rig, it works well and sounds wonderful at reasonable volumes- once a drummer gets going (I play with Rudy Royston alot, and he can really get going), the mic becomes pretty useless. I've been lucky enough to find myself in a very acoustic situation currently, so I use no amplification on stage, just the mic straight to the house in nice mid-size rooms, with a minimal monitor setup for the band. We do have some bass in the monitors, and it sounds pretty natural. Didn't use the upright with Leftover Salmon very much, that was a loud band, so it would have been more of a prop than anything else. Man, Mark Raynes is one of my favorite drummers, I don't get to play with him often enough.