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Curious but turned off by wanted ad.

Discussion in 'Band Management [BG]' started by capnsandwich, Aug 22, 2012.


  1. I read this ad here:

    I'm curious as to what "do it for the love of music than the love of money" means. I do love music very much, being a musician, but I also NEED money in order to pay bills and make ends meet.

    Is this kind of ad trying to tell me that they're not a professional band, just more of a weekend warrior type of band? I'd love to play in a band that gigs but I do need something for my efforts since gas is getting more and more expensive week to week anymore. It also seems that they're kind of expecting a lot by saying, "need player that can learn fast, play it right" but then turn around and say, "Must be secure and stable enough to not have to worry whether thay make 40 bucks a night or 100. Must be willing to start at the bottom and work thier way to the top...Not the other way around."

    I don't know, just seems like a lot more work than benefits to me.
     
  2. kesslari

    kesslari Groovin' with the Big Dogs Supporting Member

    Dec 21, 2007
    Santa Cruz Mtns, California
    Lark in the Morning Instructional Videos; Audix Microphones
    I think you're reading it right, and it doesn't suit you.
    For a lot of us - I'm 50, I have a good day gig. I don't need the money I make from gigs. That's not to say that I don't expect to get paid. But I can afford not to play a crappy gig that brings me in $100, and to take one that's crazy fun and relaxed but may only pay me $30. I've also got a family - I don't want 4-5 gigs per week.
    So playing in a band with other good musicians who have similar lifestyles and priorities, and it works really well for us.

    Every person has different priorities, and these change at different points in their life. There was a time when the gig of preference was whichever one paid more, because I could stomach a lot of "not much fun" and needed the gig money to pay my rent. Now, it's a different set of priorities and wants.
     
  3. lowfreq33

    lowfreq33

    Jan 27, 2010
    Nashville
    Endorsing Artist: Genz Benz Amplification
    It usually means "we play music that very few people like, so you should have a day job". Or, "we aren't very good, so you should have a day job". Possibly "we're all 19 and live at home, so you should have a day job".

    Note that in each of these situations you'll be constantly berated for how much your day job is interfering with "the baaaaaand, maaaaaaan!".
     
  4. Corbeau

    Corbeau

    Dec 14, 2011
    Australia
    I see ads like that all the time. I have a different interpretation, in that it seems they want someone who can be dedicated to the music without thinking of commercial interests. Sometimes I've seen bands who deliberately change their sound to cash in on the latest trends, which IMO is a bit sad because they end up sounding like anyone else in their genre. So, I guess I would interpret ads like those as saying they are prepared not to compromise their sound to get more audience members.

    It may be good or bad, really. Sometimes it can mean that they're not very good. Sometimes it can mean they are good but with a different perspective on their genre so building an audience can take some time.
     
  5. totalimmortal08

    totalimmortal08

    Jan 21, 2008
    I would pass because they failed to use proper spelling.
     
  6. seang15

    seang15

    Aug 28, 2008
    Cary NC
    +1
     
  7. CS

    CS

    Dec 11, 1999
    UK
    Here's a translation of the advert.

    Acoustic Southern Egotist wants sidemen/servants who will pay for free. In the unlikely event of it succeeding, aforementioned rock star will take all royalty payments and hire a pro band.
     
  8. the yeti

    the yeti

    Nov 6, 2007
    raleigh, nc
    a hundred bucks a night is def not the top. nowhere near. i hear around nashville paying jobs are tough to come by though (is that right nashville guys?).

    hard to figure but based *only* on the ad i'd say there's a decent chance the guys kinda flakey.
     
  9. ChrisB2

    ChrisB2 Bass... in your fass

    Feb 27, 2008
    TalkBass > Off Topic
    "I'm starting a new band with guitarist. We have a few songs roughed in but not ready to gig and not making any money. Will maybe... MAYBE be playing in and around Nashville whenever we can scratch up some songs and find a gig. Might be a few months... or never. Interested??? Contact us now!!!"

    Columbus to Nashville is kind of a long commute isn't it?? :p
     
  10. tycobb73

    tycobb73

    Jul 23, 2006
    Grand Rapids MI
    I think this pretty much explains it.

    Must be willing to start at the bottom and work thier way to the top...Not the other way around.
     
  11. mellowinman

    mellowinman Free Man

    Oct 19, 2011
    Minneapolis
    I think people are reading too much into it. It means what it means. There are a lot of people who think you should get top dollar, even before you've established any kind of track record.

    It just doesn't work that way.
     
  12. jarrydee

    jarrydee

    Oct 22, 2011
    Michigan
    +1, and I also would not have a problem playing a night for 100 bucks...I like to play and the 100 bucks is just a bonus. As for not playing with them because of their spelling...wow, I can just picture 90% of TB'ers with their fancy suits on stage talking about the low down uneducated other 10%...we are not worthy :rollno:..I spell like crap on line, I type fast and always misspell words, god help anyone wanting to play in my band, my spelling may interfere with my playing....NERDS~
     
  13. the yeti

    the yeti

    Nov 6, 2007
    raleigh, nc
    yeah but this guy's ad doesn't say anything about top dollar. if his idea of top dollar is the $100 he references it's probably not something that makes sense for someone trying to make a living playing (like the capn).
     
  14. the yeti

    the yeti

    Nov 6, 2007
    raleigh, nc
    here's the thing about money. practically no one thinks you're worth more than you do. if you think you're worth $40 then guess what- you're worth $40. if $100 is the high end or a lot to you, odds are that carrot will spend more time being chased than consumed. value in this business is all about perception and the most important perception is how you see yourself.
     
  15. lfmn16

    lfmn16 Supporting Member

    Sep 21, 2011
    charles town, wv
    You could always call the person that posted the ad and then you will know what they mean. :D

    It could be what some are saying, which is that they are playing for no people, or it could mean that they'd rather take a job that pays $30 and advances their goals than a job that pays $100 but doesn't help them long term.

    Not everybody plays music for the money, not that there is anything wrong with that. I'm lucky; I play the music I love and get paid pretty well.
     
  16. BTW, I came to this ad by a musicians online job listing. It came to me, actually, not by me looking for it. Yes, I live in Columbus, Ohio and yes, it would be a commute. However, when you're making a living playing music, you have to be willing to go where they're paying the best. I've been to Nashville plenty of times. My wife used to live there right before we got married. It's a 6 hour trip from my house to her old one, (I can do it in 5) but the point of this thread is that I've seen a lot of ads like these and wanted a clear answer as to what their ad boils down to. What are they trying to relay? Who are they trying to get as their musicians? If they want someone who "does it for the love of music" chances are that they'll get someone who doesn't put forth the effort to push themselves to be a better musician every day. That's fine and dandy but IMO, if I put an ad out, I'd use language that was appealing to the widest variety of musicians I could find. Then, when the subject of money came up, you could tell them where the band is at and your vision as a ban d and then let them decide if they want to join or not.

    Just my opinion, mind you.
     
  17. Ewo

    Ewo a/k/a Steve Cooper Supporting Member

    Apr 2, 2008
    Huntington WV
    Hey there, Cap'n! (We met at the Columbus GTG a couple years back.)

    My .02 is that the wording of the ad is equivocal; that's why folks on the thread are reading it to mean different things regarding the band's seriousness and professionalism.


    I'd agree with lfmn16, above, that it'd be smart to contact them by phone, and chat for a while. Clarify where they're coming from, and where you're coming from. Then you can decide if it's something you want to pursue.
     
  18. the yeti

    the yeti

    Nov 6, 2007
    raleigh, nc
    all your questions can be answered by following this advice:

    short of that everyone guesses based on their own past experience.
     
  19. obimark

    obimark

    Sep 1, 2011
    I've said this before (see my thread) but in Atlanta CL sucks SO hard, because it is 98% these types of ads. Tons of posers, wannabes and people who think they need a bass player to show up just so they have one to drown out with there overloud practice volume and Neil Peart garage band drum chops.
    I would say at any given time 95% of it here is complete and utter garbage and bizarre EGO trip powerplays (and yes I know a small percentage of you found the perfect band that you are gigging with now thru CL:)
     
  20. Joe Nerve

    Joe Nerve Supporting Member

    Oct 7, 2000
    New York City
    Endorsing artist: Musicman basses
    That's exactly what I saw.

    And I don't think people are reading too much into it, but they're not comprehending what they're reading.

    Playing for the love of music as opposed to playing for money is a common, clear cut request. Simply put, it means someone is looking for people who are self supporting by means usually other than music, and aren't going to complain if they don't get paid. And there are a lot of musicians out there who fit the part and are willing to this. It's an understandable request when it's a band creating music together. This guy, however, wants you to learn HIS songs, note for note, quickly... and do it for nothing. And if somewhere down the line you disagree with him on something, regardless of how much time and effort you put into it, he'll find someone esle.

    Run from these people. This is experience talking. You can find the same people who will pay you. Happily.
     

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