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Food Hacks And Tips

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by StudioStuntz, Mar 2, 2016.


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  1. Soitanly!

    280full.
     
  2. elgecko

    elgecko

    Apr 30, 2007
    Anasleim, CA
    That was the secret to about 70% of the dishes at our restarantula but not fried rice.
     
    One Drop likes this.
  3. One Drop

    One Drop

    Oct 10, 2004
    Swiss Alps
    Oyster sauce is commonly used to make fried noodles but not often for fried rice.

    Commonly for egg fried rice some beaten egg is used to coat the rice before frying it, and the rest fried separately to remain in peices.
     
  4. elgecko

    elgecko

    Apr 30, 2007
    Anasleim, CA
    The only noodle dish we used oyster sauce in was lomi, which was a noodle soup. But then again, we were cooking Filipino/Chinese, not straight Chinese.

    Lomi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    EDIT: Now I have a serious lomi Jones! :atoz:
     
  5. StudioStuntz

    StudioStuntz

    Jul 19, 2015
    If you spray Tupper/plastic ware with nonstick cooking spray before pouring in tomato based sauces it reduces or eliminate stains.

    If that doesn't work, put the containers face-up in the summer sunlight for several or so days helps reduce or eliminate stains.
     
  6. elgecko

    elgecko

    Apr 30, 2007
    Anasleim, CA
    I keep forgetting to do that when using my slow cooker.
     
    StudioStuntz likes this.
  7. elgecko

    elgecko

    Apr 30, 2007
    Anasleim, CA
    Does anyone brine their chicken? It supposed to make it more moist and flavorful. I just did some drumsticks that I'll be cooking tomorrow.
     
  8. One Drop

    One Drop

    Oct 10, 2004
    Swiss Alps
    I brine chickens and turkeys before smoking them, never anytime else.

    It does make the texture even better and they do retain more moisture during cooking.

    At least 24 hours is needed.
     
    ak56 and elgecko like this.
  9. StudioStuntz

    StudioStuntz

    Jul 19, 2015
    I did for baking boneless/skinless breasts and it really helped.

    The drumsticks should really turn out moist as dark meat doesn't dry out as easily as white meat.

    Brining does make it more flavorful as to all the salt. Some also add sugar.

    Some use a clean plastic 5 gallon paint bucket.

    I bought one of those clear hard plastic brining tubs (with a plastic lid) and units of measure markings.
     
  10. elgecko

    elgecko

    Apr 30, 2007
    Anasleim, CA
    Yeah, the results didn't "blow me away" with drumsticks. I'm guessing they'd be better for breasts or whole chickens.
     
    One Drop likes this.
  11. Mark Wilson

    Mark Wilson Supporting Member

    Jan 12, 2005
    Toronto, Ontario
    Endorsing Artist: Elixir® Strings
    Yeah I can see why it wasn't great. The idea of brining is supposed to use the salt to open the pores allowing it to absorb more and make a juicer product. Breasts or whole animals would be way better than just drum sticks.
     
    elgecko likes this.
  12. RED J

    RED J Lol

    Jan 23, 2000
    Well kept secret to incredible flavor.
     
    Eric Perry, One Drop and elgecko like this.
  13. One Drop

    One Drop

    Oct 10, 2004
    Swiss Alps
    And as old as Roman times if not older.

    I use it all the time in southeast Asian cuisine, it's the ingredient that is too often left out or used too sparingly by Western cooks when they attempt those recipes.
     
    RED J likes this.
  14. Kinsman

    Kinsman

    Jan 6, 2016
    Montana
    Talking about pizza dough and bubbles:

    Technique is more important than ingredients!

    Flour/water/salt/yeast is all you need. Make a really wet dough. Cook it as hot as you can; pizza stone preferred.

    The moisture cooking out of the dough will make glorious bubbles.

    Signed,
    A guy who owns and operates a BBQ/pizza place.
     
    elgecko, carl h. and Rob22315 like this.
  15. petrus61

    petrus61 Supporting Member

    image.
     
    RED J likes this.
  16. ColdEye

    ColdEye Supporting Member

    Oct 22, 2015
    San Diego, CA
    Care to share your recipe for lomi? I have not had that in I think 5 years!
     
  17. StudioStuntz

    StudioStuntz

    Jul 19, 2015
    Fish and oyster sauce in that order for Asian foods.


    Fish sauce is merely anchovies plus each countries and manufacturers twist with added extras.


    Experiment if you can with Vietnam, Thai, Chinese, and Korean etc. fish sauces for varying salt/sugar ratios.


    For Italian or other non-Asian cooking, make your own anchovies paste/fish sauce.


    In non-Asian cooking most people dislike anchovies because of the salt, not the fish taste.
    If that's the case, take them out of the container, drain and rinse them, then let them soak in milk for 5-10 minutes, then use a couple in salad dressing, or tomato-based pasta sauces.


    Try to buy them in the bottle w/olive oil and no seasonings.
     
  18. elgecko

    elgecko

    Apr 30, 2007
    Anasleim, CA
    That's probably my issue. I tend to make my dough on the dryer side...it's easier hand knead. :oops:

    You don't use oil in your dough? Do you make New York style?
     
  19. elgecko

    elgecko

    Apr 30, 2007
    Anasleim, CA
    It's been over 20 years since I've cooked it so I may may fudging something here or there. Also, I apologize for not giving exact/accurate amounts...I was taught to cook by adding "this much" or "that much", it was all done by taste and experience.

    - brown ~2 tbsp of minced onions
    - add & stir fry 1/2 cup of chopped cabbage and cooked pork, halved fish balls, and sliced kikiam
    - add ~2 cups of meat stock, a handful of cooked, miki noodles, and some whole, raw shrimp
    - flavor with 1 tsp oyster sauce, 1/2 tsp sugar, 1/4 tsp MSG (VERY approximate!) and simmer
    - bring to a boil and thicken with corn starch slurry
    - drizzle scrambled egg into soup and cooking briefly without disturbing egg (1 or 2 stirs is okay)
    - put it in a bowl and garnish with chopped, green onions

    That's how I remember it. Like I said, it's been years and this thread has given a deep craving for it. I'm going to have to find some locally!

    If you ever make it up to West Covina, stop by Miki House for a GREAT bowl of lomi!

    Miki House - West Covina, CA
     
    ColdEye likes this.
  20. elgecko

    elgecko

    Apr 30, 2007
    Anasleim, CA
    ...anchovies, other fish, shellfish, squid...hell, just about anything from the ocean can be and is used to make fish sauce, mostly dependent on where it's made . By definition, all fish sauces are fermented. Most interesting, worcestershire sauce is essentially a westernized fish sauce.

    5160022001.
     
    StudioStuntz likes this.

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