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how do modes work, really?

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by ILLINOX, Jun 29, 2011.


  1. Billnc

    Billnc

    Aug 6, 2009
    Charlotte NC
    I studied harmony extensively in the mid to late 70's. I quit playing for a few years. I got back into it, reviewed my old lessons and bought some books on soloing. I was in Germany and needed an English speaking teacher, with a lot of flexibility since I was in the Army. In the mean time I worked out what modes to play over what chords. I just found those charts, complicated chord sheets with even more convoluted modes written in. It is no wonder I didn't get anywhere. I was doing better soloing when I only knew chords. When I found a teacher modes were only covered for modal music.

    Modes are very simple really, so simple that the use of them probably requires a teacher, they are the most misunderstood basic object in music theory. These threads are always as convoluted and contain as misinformation as legal advice threads.

    No flame to the guys who have doled out good info.
     
  2. Stick_Player

    Stick_Player Banned

    Nov 13, 2009
    Somewhere on the Alaska Panhandle (Juneau)
    Endorser: Plants vs. Zombies Pea Shooters
    This was posted in another thread:

    http://www.talkbass.com/forum/f22/music-theory-book-free-download-790165/

    Go to the Advanced chapter about modes.

    Perhaps this writer's words are simpler to understand what Modes Really are. This quote sums it up very well:

    "In other words, whenever a vamp is played with a triad or more complex chord, the mode is implied by the chord. Once again if the chord is part of a tonal sequence, the mode is implied by the chord progression, not by the fingering pattern you happen to use to play the notes of that tonality. If you remember this, you will avoid most of the confusion around modes and patterns."

    Very well stated!
     
  3. Best response so far.

    Simply put, familiarizing yourself with modes will make you a much more competent and interesting player. Practicing these scales will help your technique, soloing, and make you much less afraid of notes past the 5th fret.

    Check out this video my brother did on modes and apply it to bass, it will improve your playing 100%. Guaranteed.

    [edit] Unless you're content playing root 5 octave the whole time. Also, if anyone wants, PM me and I'll send you the PDF for that video. Definitely a good exercise.

    ‪Modal Arpeggios‬‏ - YouTube
     
  4. Stick_Player

    Stick_Player Banned

    Nov 13, 2009
    Somewhere on the Alaska Panhandle (Juneau)
    Endorser: Plants vs. Zombies Pea Shooters
    No comment on whether this exercise "will improve your playing 100%. Guaranteed".

    However, this video has nothing to do with Modes. This is simply an exercise in harmonizing, by way of arpeggiating, an F Major scale.

    Listening all the way through, it never leaves the Key of F Major.

    Once again a misunderstanding of what Modes are. :rollno:

    I do see that it could help with hand dexterity, though.
     
  5. mrekoj

    mrekoj

    Feb 17, 2009
    anyone shared this ?
    from wiki
    Musical mode - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    in short

    Ionian I C T-T-s-T-T-T-s
    Dorian II D T-s-T-T-T-s-T
    Phrygian III E s-T-T-T-s-T-T
    Lydian IV F T-T-T-s-T-T-s
    Mixolydian V G T-T-s-T-T-s-T
    Aeolian VI A T-s-T-T-s-T-T
    Locrian VII B s-T-T-s-T-T-T
     
  6. Stick_Player

    Stick_Player Banned

    Nov 13, 2009
    Somewhere on the Alaska Panhandle (Juneau)
    Endorser: Plants vs. Zombies Pea Shooters
    Probably page one of this thread.

    But the topic is: "how do modes work, really?"

    I'll restate this:

    http://www.talkbass.com/forum/f22/music-theory-book-free-download-790165/

    Go to the Advanced chapter about Modes.

    Perhaps this writer's words are simpler to understand what Modes Really are. This quote sums it up very well:

    "In other words, whenever a vamp is played with a triad or more complex chord, the mode is implied by the chord. Once again if the chord is part of a tonal sequence, the mode is implied by the chord progression, not by the fingering pattern you happen to use to play the notes of that tonality. If you remember this, you will avoid most of the confusion around modes and patterns."
     
  7. AndyMania

    AndyMania

    Jan 3, 2010
    This music theory pdf is awesome! Now I know about what modes really are.
     

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