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How to do a proper recording for YouTube?

Discussion in 'Recording Gear and Equipment [BG]' started by gregmon79, Oct 11, 2013.


  1. gregmon79

    gregmon79 I did it for the muff... Supporting Member

    Dec 20, 2012
    Chicago IL
    I'm wondering how this is done. I don't want to just set my phone down and record through the mic on it, I want to plug into my computer and record it to where it sounds good and proper. I know I need an interface of some sort but what kind? I have an interface that came with my Studio One recording program for my PC, will this do the job? And how do I do it if it will? Do I need my computer for this type of recording and if so, how am I suppose to record it with video?? I've never tried or delved into this type of recording so I'm pretty clueless. Can someone point me to a link please and or help me out a little, I'd very much appreciate it, thanks!!
     
  2. Pokerdweebz

    Pokerdweebz

    Oct 26, 2012
    Lititz, PA
    I know a way, which I know is probably not the best way. I could not find any info on it the same way you can't so I made up my own way.

    I use a webcam (whether it is the one internal to my laptop or not doesn't matter) and record a video on in getting the audio from my Presonus audio interface. I then add the song to the background of the video and spend craploads of time trying to line them up.

    This works. I've done it. IT SUCKS. There has to be a better way, but I've never found the right way to do it.
     
  3. The best way is to track and master your song, like you we're going to put in on a CD, using Pro Tools, Abelton, etc. Then film the video, listening to the song, so the timing is correct. You're not going to use the audio from the film, just the video. Then use some video editing software to match the two together. It's easier than it sounds.
     
  4. LumberjackTBird

    LumberjackTBird

    Aug 5, 2012
    Kansas
    right now it's b3 direct into audacity, DSLR on me and use on cam mic for voice. Haven't got any posted tho... I've tried lots of different things, from webcam and mic to this now.
     
  5. gregmon79

    gregmon79 I did it for the muff... Supporting Member

    Dec 20, 2012
    Chicago IL
    So if I have a pedal with a DI out, or say my amp, the GK 1001 RB, can I go DI out from my amp to the presonus interface to the computer and record that way? I'm not trying to sync video and audio, I don't have the time nor the patience for that. Plus I believe there has got to be a better way.
     
  6. The way I've always done it is to plug my bass into my recording interface (which also serves as my computer's sound card), and then connect the headphone out from the interface to the audio input of a Zoom Q3 HD. I can use the input gain control on the interface to balance the level of my bass with the other tracks.

    The benefits of this method are that it's simple, the audio and video are in perfect synch, and there are no microphones used so there's no ambient noise. The drawback is that the resulting audio is not muti-track - I can't apply EQ or compression to the bass separately form the other tracks, and I can't change the level of the bass in the final mix. Whatever sound and mix I started with, I'm stuck with.

    Here's an example:
     
  7. TinyE

    TinyE

    Jan 31, 2013
    portland,or
    i'm guessing you have an audiobox usb.
    that works fine.
    plug it in to your computer in a usb2.0 port.
    studio one can be a little intimidating, you might try audacity, it's free, and works well with the audiobox.

    after you get the audio recorded, i would recommend a video editor for the video portion. you can try to do it all live via a web cam or something, but after 50 takes, you'll wish you had an editor.

    For that, i use Adobe Premier Elements. It is a small version of Adobe Premier, very cheap (like $40-60 on amazon), and very easy to learn. You can drag your audio file onto it, zoom way in if needed, and match your video clip perfect to the audio.
     
  8. LumberjackTBird

    LumberjackTBird

    Aug 5, 2012
    Kansas
    +1 for Premier Elements, it's really not that hard to match up audio tracks in it.
     
  9. A video editor plug in called " Plural Eyes " by Red Giant syncs up video and externally recorded audio perfectly. I record my bands gigs on a 8 track Zoom 24 recorder ( Less hassle than using a laptop and audio interface) and use plural eyes to sync all 8 tracks up with the audio track fro the video camera. I can then mix the individual tracks inside Adobe Premiere Pro. You can then bring vocals up and down, bring up the guitar for the lead break then back down when the vocals come back in. I also might put the individual tracks into cubase first to make them sound better, then export them to another folder and them bring them back into Premiere Pro. I prefer to mix them while watching the video but there is no reason you can't mix them in your DAW and export / sync the finished stereo mix or surround mix to the video. Sometimes I still keep the original camera audio and blend it with the other tracks. All depends on what you can get and how you can make it sound. You can get the " Plural Eyes " as a unlimited trial for 30 days. I brought it as soon as the trial expired. Its primary purpose is to sync multiple video camera's ( hence the name ) so you can have say one camera on a tripod getting the whole scene and other cameras being used for close ups and different angles. We have friends of the band doing this. ( I need to to play the bass ) "WARNING" I started doing this nearly 3 years ago and it has become my obsession. It can get you into an endless cycle of, need a better camera, then you need a better video editor, then you need a more powerful computer and then you you need to capture better audio, not to mention the problems of shooting video in low light situations with stage lights & effects. I actually spent more on my last camera and computer then I have ever spent on a bass! My videos have steadily improved over the 3 years. They can sound very good if you have a subwoofer on your TV set up or computer. However on standard TV speakers or laptop speakers or smart phones, I still have a long way to go.
     
  10. eddododo

    eddododo Supporting Member

    Apr 7, 2010
    ignoring gear/brands, ill give a simple tip to make the whole process easier...

    when you start the recording with video, do something very obvious and articulate sonically and visually- clicking two drumsticks together is PERFECT..

    FWIW, I have tried to do the record/overdub thing, but I just do not like it.. it 'seems' too 'artificial' to me, and I found it difficult to really make myself jive with the whole process (I do have a bit of a tendency to not play it the same twice ever...).. Even though its a personal problem, it does bring up the important issue of ''what if i play a badass solo with some 'accidental' lines that i could never do again''.. i know its rare, but lets give a complete picture to rule out incomplete processes...


    so to sum it up
    1) Distinct indicators for A/V, like a clap
    2) I prefer to do video and audio simultaneously, using appropriate audio recording devices and a seperate camera; if youre playing music for a video, camera sound is just poopoo and I will 'x-out' of your video within seconds... even a Zoom across the room is much better than whatever camera you have, most likely even than the ones with 'great' sound
    3)Do something that will work every time, rather than some weird convoluted system that involves recording twice for one take and having to 'nail it' when youre lip-synching
     
  11. gregmon79

    gregmon79 I did it for the muff... Supporting Member

    Dec 20, 2012
    Chicago IL
    I honestly thought this was most simple than it sounds. All I want to do is do pedal demos and stuff like that on YouTube. I had no idea it was this in depth.
     
  12. eddododo

    eddododo Supporting Member

    Apr 7, 2010
    ignoring gear/brands, ill give a couple tips i learned from my mistakes, to make the whole process easier...

    if youre playing music for a video, camera sound is just poopoo and I will 'x-out' of your video within seconds... even a Zoom across the room is much better than whatever camera you have, most likely even than the ones with 'great' sound

    when you start the recording with video, do something very obvious and articulate sonically and visually- clicking two drumsticks together a few times is PERFECT;
    That way you have a super clear indicator of where to 'sync' audio, instead of trying to 'read' bass technique.. thats barely easy live, let alone with computer playback.. there's just alot of subtlety and misdirection of the visual component of either right or left hand technique.

    FWIW, I have tried to do the audio-then-video overdub thing, but I just do not like it.. it 'seems' too 'artificial' to me [i know such language is a little silly, but frankly with music, those esoteric feelings actually count], and I found it difficult to really make myself jive with the whole process (I do have a bit of a tendency to not play it the same twice ever...).. Even though its a personal problem, it does bring up the important issue of ''what if i play a badass solo with some 'accidental' lines that i could never do again''.. i know its rare, but lets give a complete picture to rule out incomplete processes...


    for bonus points- If youre mic'ing, mic your amp appropriately, not the room if you can help it. Like i said, devices like the Zoom are pretty great, but if youre showing off some sweet tone gear, mic the ampp baby. Psst... Markbass... The Compressore is a FANTASTIC pedal.. the official video, however, is USELESS! crappy room-noise for such a subtle effect? It doesnt even make the amp sound good...

    so to sum it up
    1) do video and audio simultaneously, using appropriate audio recording devices and a seperate camera
    2) Distinct indicators for A/V, like a clap
    3)Do something that will work every time, rather than some weird convoluted system that involves recording twice for one take and having to 'nail it' when youre lip-synching
    If i can play the snark, or the teacher if you prefer: If you couldnt lay down the track with the camera rolling, then you shouldnt perhaps be making a video.
     
  13. gregmon79

    gregmon79 I did it for the muff... Supporting Member

    Dec 20, 2012
    Chicago IL
    What id like to do, which I thought was possible, is just give a pedal demo with my board plugged into the audio interface then I to the computer while recording video at the same time. Is this possible?
     
  14. Ukiah Bass

    Ukiah Bass Supporting Member

    May 10, 2006
    No, it's not this simple. You'll have to put some effort into the project to make it sound and look good. That's why most YouTube demos look and sound like crap.
     
  15. eddododo

    eddododo Supporting Member

    Apr 7, 2010
    You need appropriate programs to make it all jive, indeed...
    What you COULD do, is record good audio (I assume, because you have an interface, that you have something like Protools or Nuendo) and do a slideshow of the knob settings being used, along with the enclosure and size reference, etc...

    Stick to a well-thought-out script, including musically, skip some of the stuff that we could read, and rock it on out :hyper:
     
  16. Dave W

    Dave W Supporting Member

    Mar 1, 2007
    White Plains
    This is key for easily syncing the audio and video. I prefer the hand clap.

    Clap your hands right in front of the camera. You'll be able to pinpoint on the video the exact point where both of your hands come together, and you'll be able to see the big audio spike in your recording software.

    Just line them up and you're synced!
     
  17. gregmon79

    gregmon79 I did it for the muff... Supporting Member

    Dec 20, 2012
    Chicago IL
    So this is the only way to do it? Recording the video and audio separately then sync them together. Is there a link anyone can post so I can get a how to in front of my face to educate me?
     
  18. Ivan M

    Ivan M

    Aug 2, 2010
    Bronx, NY
    Yes for the best sound purposes it sure is. It is not to difficult i use a MAC and the M-Audio interface and record with my VIXIA HD cam. After you do 1-2 it will be a breeze. In the beginning it took me a while. Now i can do recordings on the first take and then match the video with the sound. When editing you will eliminate the original sound and use the sound from the recorded file. I use GARAGEBAND if that helps you out.
     
  19. gregmon79

    gregmon79 I did it for the muff... Supporting Member

    Dec 20, 2012
    Chicago IL
    I have a PC and GarageBand on my iphone. Will that help??
     
  20. LumberjackTBird

    LumberjackTBird

    Aug 5, 2012
    Kansas
    depending on different things, you could go straight into the computer and record the audio from an input, but you would have to have a multiple channel one to get your voice and amp.

    EX) I can run a cable from my amp/pedal/whatever straight into my macbook, then set up iMovie to record with the webcam and use the input for audio instead of the webcam mic.

    I don't do this because I prefer my nice HD cam as opposed to the crappy webcam one...
     

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