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Russian language

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by Mr.QuakQuak, Mar 25, 2006.


  1. I need certain courses in my fall semester to start satisfying certain areas (They call them A-F)

    Do to my schedule I can't really take anything to my interest but there is a night course from 7-10 pm called Elementry Russian. I'm prodominitley polish and russian so taking russian does interest me. I was wodnering if anyone knows or has taken this language and get give me some insight like its difficulty etc.
     
  2. Tsal

    Tsal

    Jan 28, 2000
    Finland, EU
    I've taken a course or two. Getting to know the cyrillic alphabet is important. It's also something you can mostly teach yourself. After that it gets easier.

    Some courses attempt to teach language before you can properly manage the cyrillics, which I think is very difficult way of doing things - it's hard to try to find correct way of phrasing if you cannot read the word from a paper. Otherwise, russian as a language is a bit coarse, so there are not million different forms from a single word and it's quite easy to form sentences after you get the idea.
     
  3. My grandparents all passed away my birth so I never learned anything from them. They never really tought my parents. I think I may take the course, I can always drop it if I think I got in too deep and replace it with something else.
     
  4. I'm doing beginner Russina at uni this year. I will probably fail, but if you can be bothered to put the hours in and learn all the grammar details and practice it, you will be fine.
     
  5. Vorago

    Vorago (((o)))

    Jul 17, 2003
    Antwerp, Belgium
    The only thing I know about russian is that it has cases and there's a difference between objects with or without a soul.
     
  6. kserg

    kserg

    Feb 20, 2004
    San Jose, CA
    If you decide take it and need some help later on I can help you. I am not terribly good with writing (its not only English I am bad at, it’s all writing). But I can be of some help as it is my first language.

    On difficulty I can’t really speak.
     
  7. I think I'm going to take it. Only knowing English is starting to upset me. I'm thinking of trying to take Spanish at one point also. I appreciate the feedback guys.
     
  8. Вы были хорошим мальчиком и можете иметь немного сыра теперь.

    That means that you have been a good boy and may have some cheese now.

    Russian is such a cool sounding language. Especially when you argue in it. Kinda like Klingon.:D

    Rock on
    Eric
     
  9. Ericman197

    Ericman197

    Feb 23, 2004
    Iowa
    If you need the course, take it. I took a women's studies course and an ancient chinese civilization course in the winter to satisfy general education requirements. If it turns out that the masters courses I'm taking at UMDNJ don't transfer towards my undergraduate degree, I'll end up taking even more random courses. College is just a stepping stone.
     
  10. I don't have to take it but I need something in that are to satisfy the number or credits for the area, russian interests me.
     
  11. kserg

    kserg

    Feb 20, 2004
    San Jose, CA

    See, Intrest is nice but will it be useful. :)
     
  12. malthumb

    malthumb

    Mar 25, 2001
    The Motor City
    Been more than 15 years since I've actively conversed in Russian, but I still got most of that. :D :D

    I'm thinking Cblpa (pronounced "sirra") = cheese, since I can interpret all the other words.

    Peace,

    James
     
  13. kserg

    kserg

    Feb 20, 2004
    San Jose, CA
    Yes... we have swear words/fraises that you guys would not dream of. :)

    Sad, my bro got married and his wife can't stand swearing. I do nothing but. This is going to be very hard.


    That sentance has a funny sound to it. "Вы" is either a formal way of saying "you" or to more then 1 person. Some words in that sentance is directed to more then 1 person and some are not. If its to multiple persons then "хорошим мальчиком" which means "good boy" would be "хорошими мальчикоми".

    If its to a single person it is unlikely that someone would address a kid in Formal "you". Un-formal way of saying it is "ты" (ti) so more likely a person will use "ты" instead. "были" will become "был" and "можете" will become "можеш".

    Also the end of the sentance has this funny sound to it. I would take "иметь" and replace it with "вэять" which means "take" but is close to what you mean, "иметь" means more like "to own". Also теперь will go after "и".

    So if its to more then 1 person i would say:

    "Вы были хорошими мальчикоми и теперь можете вэять немного сыра."

    Sounds like:

    "Vi bili horoshumu mal`chikomi i teper` mojete vzyat` hemnogo sira"

    (note that` is soft sign so letter before it sounds softer, it is the same as "ь", also "ы" is simular to i but harder i guess, its a cross of i and u in english, as concept i dont think english have either one of those. Same goes for "Ъ" which is a letter that makes letter before it harder (hehe) but not in use in any of these words).

    If it is to single person then:

    "ты был хорошим мальчиком и теперь можеш вэять немного сыра."

    Sounds like:

    "Ti bil horoshim mal`chikom i teper` mojesh vzyat` nemnogo sira"

    I still might have done some mistake there, i am rusty:) Have i scared anyone away from learning it yet? :)
     
  14. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member In Memoriam

    I did Russian O Level - I remember there was a lot of grammar to get through - like Latin.

    So we learned NAGDIL!! ;)

    Nominative
    Accusative
    Genetive
    Dative
    Instrumental
    Locative


    Cases...:eek:
     
  15. westland

    westland

    Oct 8, 2004
    Hong Kong

    I'd agree with this. Russian was my high school language, and I got back to it when I was doing business in Russia in the mid-90s. Once you get the alphabet down, which you can do in an hour or so, then you can learn a lot yourself. Just read, and when you speak, think of Boris Badanoff ... kind of chew the words ... you'll be speaking like a native in a semester.
     
  16. Vorago

    Vorago (((o)))

    Jul 17, 2003
    Antwerp, Belgium
    Cases are a bitch, try Finnish, they have 15 (!) cases!
     
  17. duo8675309

    duo8675309

    Jun 5, 2005
    You could always learn the chineese alphabet! :D
     
  18. Vorago

    Vorago (((o)))

    Jul 17, 2003
    Antwerp, Belgium
    ehm, they have logograms, no alphabet. It's a system based on the meaning of symbols, not their phonological representation in spoken language. For instance [I'm making this up, but you catch the drift]: a vertical line might mean 'water', a vertical line with one horizontal line across might mean 'river', two horizontal lines on the vertical one might mean 'rain', etc...

    Problem is that this is not a discrete combinatoric (sp) system. In western languages you can make any word with a combination of something like 25 signs, and the relation between sign and sound is rather strict (not so much in English; think of 'tought and 'tough' for instance, this is also why dyslexia is very hard to solve in English speaking countries). Chinese requires you to learn a ****load of characters by heart, with no connection between pronounciation and appearance of character.
     
  19. duo8675309

    duo8675309

    Jun 5, 2005
    I know this. Except for the lolograms part. I just thought it was called an alphabet. But yeah I knew that they all meant basically words.
     
  20. Vorago

    Vorago (((o)))

    Jul 17, 2003
    Antwerp, Belgium
    Ok then ;)
     

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