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Things any good bassist should be able to do.

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by Waytootrue, Aug 19, 2018.


  1. Steadfast

    Steadfast

    Sep 28, 2015
    Search Me
    Idk. My probation officer won't let me hang out at colleges.
     
  2. fdeck

    fdeck Supporting Member Commercial User

    Mar 20, 2004
    Madison WI
    HPF Technology LLC
    Not a bad question at all. When you want to attend college as a music major, you apply to the college in the usual way, but then you have to apply for and get into the music program as well. If you get accepted by the college but not the music program, you can take music classes and participate in some ensembles, but can't be a music major.

    My knowledge is related to the "classical" oriented programs. Typically you fill out a separate application, and have separate recommendations, e.g., from your music teachers. You have to do an audition. In classical programs, you would probably play a challenging movement from a concerto, some "contrasting" piece, and also be prepared for playing scales, sight-reading, etc.

    In addition to this process, a music student has to be accepted into the studio of an individual teacher, so they would probably schedule trial lessons with one or more teachers at the colleges where they are applying.

    Music students are expected to already be playing at an advanced level when they apply for college. What that means is different for each instrument.
     
    Jim Carr likes this.
  3. Jim Carr

    Jim Carr Dr. Jim Gold Supporting Member

    Jan 21, 2006
    Denton, TX or Kailua, HI
    fEARful Kool-Aid dispensing liberal academic card-carrying union member Musicians Local 72-147
    For you? Perhaps. :roflmao: :whistle: :whistle: :whistle:
     
    saabfender and lfmn16 like this.
  4. Jim Carr

    Jim Carr Dr. Jim Gold Supporting Member

    Jan 21, 2006
    Denton, TX or Kailua, HI
    fEARful Kool-Aid dispensing liberal academic card-carrying union member Musicians Local 72-147
    Solid Advice! The financial part is so often over-looked and let's face it, if after graduating you are in a cubicle 9-5 for 10 years to pay off school loans, you probably are not going to have a music career!
     
  5. socialleper

    socialleper Bringer of doom and top shelf beer Supporting Member

    May 31, 2009
    Canyon Country, CA
    Neither Jaco or Jamerson even went to college.
    Just sayn'
     
  6. socialleper

    socialleper Bringer of doom and top shelf beer Supporting Member

    May 31, 2009
    Canyon Country, CA
    There is much about college that seems like hucking time and money down the toilet, but man that seems like a lot of fiery hoops to jump through. Admittedly there was a brief time when I was in High School when I thought about that. I wasn't really in tune with the fact that music college was really for a very specific group of people and would have done me little good.
     
  7. What he said. This stuff doesn't just happen, it takes a lot of practice. View attachment 3123253
     
    MG Wolf, saabfender and BillyBA like this.
  8. Jeff Bonny

    Jeff Bonny Supporting Member

    Nov 20, 2000
    Vancouver, BC
    The list of true heavies who did go to school is a **** of a lot longer than the guys who didn't. Besides that times were different when Jaco and Jamerson were coming up. There were more gigs and there was more opportunity to learn on the gig. Even so people like Miles, Abraham Laboriel, Michael Manring, Tony Levin, Tal Wilkenfeld etc, etc, etc, etc, etc all went to school. I definitely have issues with the music education "business" but the positives outweigh the negatives. If nothing else it's worth going to school to meet and hang out with people you'll be working with sometimes your entire career.

    Just sayin'.....
     
    Jim Carr, saabfender and Ekulati like this.
  9. Groove definitely, but if I had to pick one quality of my favorite bass players (or drummers) it's creativity, or style I guess. Someone that does something unconventional but tasteful. It's usually not something I CAN'T do, but something I might not have necessarily thought of. (and sometimes it's something I think I might do but would chicken out and play it safer)
     
  10. fdeck

    fdeck Supporting Member Commercial User

    Mar 20, 2004
    Madison WI
    HPF Technology LLC
    Higher education is certainly an interesting topic for debate.

    One thing to consider is that these "hoops" are fairly routine for the people who are applying. Remember, you're talking about people who want to engage in academic study of academic music, and have already been doing so. By the time your typical violin student is applying for music school, they've had years of lessons that are inherently college-preparatory, from teachers who have also been to music school. They've played in dozens of recitals, and have probably gone through several auditions for groups that they want to play in.
     
    Jim Carr and Ekulati like this.
  11. craigie

    craigie

    Nov 11, 2015
    calgary
    And if you really want a real world simulation have a guitarist put on a capo (they don’t have to actually play) and tell you the wrong chords
     
    wesonbass, Atshen and caledoneus83 like this.
  12. craigie

    craigie

    Nov 11, 2015
    calgary
    These are all things music school endeavours to teach. They can’t teach creativity.
     
  13. socialleper

    socialleper Bringer of doom and top shelf beer Supporting Member

    May 31, 2009
    Canyon Country, CA
    That all feels like a lot of hoops too. Kinda makes you realize why young people have such little interest in learning music with instruments.
     
  14. fdeck

    fdeck Supporting Member Commercial User

    Mar 20, 2004
    Madison WI
    HPF Technology LLC
    The instruments that involve none of those hoops -- electric guitar and bass -- are facing the greatest decline in popularity.

    However, organized instrumental music is enough of a counterculture that I suspect it's hard to draw strong conclusions about it. A better comparison might be organized sports, which also involve training, practice, competition, etc.

    Anecdotally, I took cello lessons for 8 years as a kid, played music at school, and in a community orchestra. My kids are both into music. The local school music programs are at full capacity. The Wisconsin Youth Symphony Orchestras just added a fifth orchestra to meet demand.
     
  15. socialleper

    socialleper Bringer of doom and top shelf beer Supporting Member

    May 31, 2009
    Canyon Country, CA
    I'm just riffing on the people that use this as their tired argument against 5 or 6 string basses.
     
  16. saabfender

    saabfender

    Jan 10, 2018
    Indianapolis
    Be on time.
    Learn the damn songs.
    Be nice to the drummer.
    Don't have crap gear.
     
  17. Timmy-Watts

    Timmy-Watts Supporting Member

    Nov 12, 2010
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    Not necessarily. They don't teach non-music aspects of becoming a successful musician. It is more to the test, like knowing your history, theory, repertoire, and my number 1 and 2 points. Number 3 is equally as vital.
     
  18. Timmy-Watts

    Timmy-Watts Supporting Member

    Nov 12, 2010
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    It is obviously not MANDATORY, but it is no fuss, reliable, and never pretentious. A P-Bass by nature forces you to focus on your fingers to make all the nuance in your playing, instead of knobs. A P-bass will work very well in any and all musical situations. It may not be the best for some, but it will never let you down. I have done sessions, where I tried several possibilities, and the P is often the best choice, and when it is not the best choice, it is never a bad choice.
     
  19. gln1955

    gln1955 Supporting Member

    Aug 25, 2014
    Ohio, USA
    The OP should show up with whichever bass he is 100% comfortable with. If he never plays a P, it would not be the best choice.
     
  20. Jeff Bonny

    Jeff Bonny Supporting Member

    Nov 20, 2000
    Vancouver, BC
    A lot of this depends on the bottom line motivation of the player. When feeding yourself and paying the rent isn't on the line you can afford to be more selfish. Even if you're trying to pay the bills playing it's not a great idea to sell your whole soul for a buck and do things that are genuinely painful (like playing a P bass? lol). But there is a point where you need to seriously consider what the person hiring you is looking for. Often these things have nothing to do with how you play.

    Is anyone going to argue that most of the things suggested here are nothing more than common sense applicable to any job? What are the things that separate the few at the top from the rest?
     

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