1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  

L2000 versus an L2500 for a new guy?

Discussion in 'G&L Bass Forum' started by JonW, Mar 20, 2009.


  1. JonW

    JonW

    Mar 10, 2009
    Indiana
    Hi Folks,

    I’m thinking about picking up a bass and trying to learn how to play a little. While I try to improve on guitar. The L2000 and L2500 look quite appealing for a first bass given the great versatility of sounds they can make. I like the options of playing either passive or active.

    Any thoughts on starting out with 4 strings versus 5?

    I would think that 5 strings would be more versatile in the long run. And give a little lower end extension, which could be fun for when you use it. But my reading here makes it look like the L2500 has pretty tight string spacing, which could be problematic. And maybe an L2000 might be a better place to start with. Well, there's probably no right answer here. But before I buy anything I might as well seek the wisdom of those who know much more than I do. Thanks.
     
  2. mainsail

    mainsail

    Mar 24, 2007
    San Diego Ca
    Well, my first thought is to go for the gusto and get the fiver. However, if you're just getting started with the bass, a four stringer may be more practical because you won't have the extra string to contend with in the learning process.

    I have both and really don't find the string spacing on the L2500 to be uncomfortable.

    The L2K and L2.5K are extremely versatile and will serve you well in any setting.

    The question may be how much effort do you want to spend to adapt to five strings as opposed to four, when just making the switch to bass.

    Good luck and enjoy!

     
  3. fourstringbliss

    fourstringbliss Supporting Member

    Oct 5, 2003
    Puyallup, WA
    I would suggest that you go to a store and try out some 4-strings and 5-strings. I've been back and forth between the two many times and have finally settled on fivers (which kinda makes my username a joke, huh? :rolleyes:). I think I might own a 4-string fretless at some point.

    I play on the worship team at my church and we change keys a lot. Sometimes we play in G and it's useful to play a lower C or D instead of going higher.

    I've found that if I think of the B-string as a musical thumbrest it helps, because most of the notes you'll play are on the E - G strings. The L2500 Tribute has a pretty good B-string, depending on what strings you use. The string spacing is totally manageable.
     
  4. jmattis

    jmattis Supporting Member

    Jul 6, 2007
    Washington DC
    There is the possibility that you'll prefer the tighter spacing on the 5 since you're coming from guitar. Try 'em both out if you can and make your decision then.
     
  5. fourstringbliss

    fourstringbliss Supporting Member

    Oct 5, 2003
    Puyallup, WA
    The only problem with this is it's rare to find G&L basses and guitars at GC. Good luck trying it out first!
     
  6. unclejane

    unclejane Guest

    Jul 23, 2008
    I prefer the closer string spacing of the L2500, myself. The L2000 is spaced about like the Jazz/Precision and is a bit wide for my tastes.

    As for starting out on one or the other I doubt one would be more of a problem than the other. You have to deal with 6 strings on the guitar, so 5 on the bass shouldn't be an impediment to my thinking.

    The low B isn't essential but it's a nice addition to the range of the instrument. The costs are about the same, so why not?

    LS
     
  7. JonW

    JonW

    Mar 10, 2009
    Indiana
    Thanks for all the thoughts, fellas. Much appreciated. :)


    Yeah, exactly. Also my first thought to go for it, but then again, if I’m just starting…



    Good to know. I’ve read some people mention they thought the L2500 strings were a little too close. Maybe a problem for slapping or something.

    Yeah, that’s my understanding. Which is why I’m thinking they’ll make for an excellent first bass. This video really convinced me of that:

    Very impressive versatility of sounds.

    Yeah, maybe starting with a 5er means more work up front, but less work later- no need to adapt.
     
  8. JonW

    JonW

    Mar 10, 2009
    Indiana


    Well, I live in a small town, which is both bad (few stores to test gear) and good (cheap cost of living so I can buy a bass). :) I stopped by our one local store to see what they had. No G&L’s but I played a 4 string Squier Classic Vibe P bass (amazing fit and finish for $350) and a 5 string Trabant (?) Chaos 5 string bass. Not surprisingly, the 4 string is a little easier to deal with- fewer strings to get in the way, maybe wider spacing, less neck heavy. But there’s likely to be more versatility in the 5 string, but it will take more effort and skill to extract it from the instrument. At least those are my newbie impressions. Note that I have no idea how to play bass.
     
  9. JonW

    JonW

    Mar 10, 2009
    Indiana
    Interesting. Good to hear that some actually prefer the close spacing.


    Exactly how I was thinking. But thought I’d ask the experts first. There might be some lurking reason why I shouldn’t start out with 5 strings or, more specifically, avoid the L2500 to start. But it sounds like I should probably go for the L2500 over the L2000 given the added versatility. And the ability to play a little lower and rattle the house a bit more. :)
     
  10. TomB

    TomB Supporting Member

    Aug 24, 2007
    Vermont
    I agree with the advice you've gotten so far... getting a 5 now seems like a good place to start. But I'd also recommend you spend time w/a 4 so you don't get too locked into the 5-string mentality if you expect to play a lot. The reason is that you may encounter 4's here and there or fall in love w/a terrific 4 for whatever reason and it's good to have that flexibility.

    Though I'd played 4's for 30 years before getting into a 5, I've since focused on being able to play either one and on going back and forth effortlessly. I recommend that as a goal for any serious bassist in the long run.

    ...and then maybe 6's some day? :)
     
  11. JonW

    JonW

    Mar 10, 2009
    Indiana
    Thanks Tom. Yeah, maybe 5 strings is a good place for me to start. Nice for versatility. But I do see your point of getting good at the basics like a 4 string. Oh, and the guitar. Now all I need is tons of free time to get good at these things. :)
     
  12. oldrookie

    oldrookie

    May 15, 2007
    Avon, IN
    I started about two years ago on fours. Now own two fives and was just given a cheap four. Haven't played one for about four months and the switch back is not as easy as I had anticipated.

    Much prefer the fivers. I would have saved some money had I just started with the fives.
     
  13. TomB

    TomB Supporting Member

    Aug 24, 2007
    Vermont
    +1 ...my experience as well. I routinely use both 4's & 5's depending on the gig. Perhaps that's because a 4 just feels right to me for certain genres. But a 5 can cover it all, and once you're really used to the 5, suddenly switching back to 4 to play the same material is harder than going the other direction, IME. It can be an awkward moment when your fingers say ''whoah, where'd that string go'', but no more awkward than going hard for the D string & having it turn out to be the A :). My point is that switching back and forth between the two is its own mental skill and requires practice, much like playing in altered tunings. To me it's worth it for the privilege of comfortably playing some 4-string basses I'll always love to take to work; to others this may not be important. If that's the case, and you need to only choose one or the other, I think the 5 wins hands down for its versatility.

    ...and to the OP: i've owned both the 2000 & the 2500 & you can't lose. They work and sound much the same and are both great axes.
     
  14. oldrookie

    oldrookie

    May 15, 2007
    Avon, IN
    +1 Have owned both...have loved both. Both great.
     
  15. JonW

    JonW

    Mar 10, 2009
    Indiana
    Thanks guys. For someone like me, starting with zero bass experience, it really sounds like 5 strings are the way to go. And for the wide array of sounds, an L2500 also seems like a really good choice. OK, that was easier than I thought it would be. :)

    Now I need to figure out if I'm really going to do this or focus more on guitar. Ideally I'd like to give a good go at both. But spare time for fun things like this is so limited. I have been really drawn to the lower octaves lately. Hmmm...
     
  16. TDR1138

    TDR1138

    Apr 11, 2007
    Section 204
    For what it's worth, I've been jumping between bass and guitar for 16 years (though always consider myself more of a bassist), and I'm just now getting my first 5-er (a Trib L2500, BTW). I can't say there's been more than a handful of times that I've wanted to go lower than what I could get on a 4-string. I'm getting the 2500 now to expand my range and see if I like it, but it's not because I feel my 4's are too limiting.

    Take into consideration the type of music you like to play. For example, if you're into 60's/70's rock, you would be fine with a 4 and probably won't miss that low B string. But if you're into modern R&B or jazz, it might come in more handy. Just something else to consider...
     
  17. KsPiNeSh

    KsPiNeSh

    Mar 28, 2008
    Kansas City
    IMO it's better to have it and not need it than to need (or want :D) it and not have it. Go for the fiver.
     
  18. Hey all,

    I wanted to chime in here also. Yes, the string spacing is a little tight compared with some of the wide-spaced five string basses on the market today, but it is definitely very manageable.

    The ability to play closed fingerings in the middle of the neck while still hitting the low E through G is pretty nice. As someone mentioned here on TB, it is like playing a short scale bass with a full scale sound. I use my B string ALL the time - but hardly ever below the 5th fret.

    I've had trouble switching back & forth also. There's nothing worse than being on a gig & playing the wrong note (only off by a perfect 4th!) due to muscle memory. An hour of practice and everything is fine.

    imp
     
  19. oldrookie

    oldrookie

    May 15, 2007
    Avon, IN
    Chebass88 makes some excellent points. It's not all about going to the low B. I'm more often using the fifth fret and above on the B string as well.
     
  20. JonW

    JonW

    Mar 10, 2009
    Indiana
    Yes, yes. You people are all making excellent points. An L2500 sounds absolutely perfect for someone like me. :D Now I'm trying to talk myself out of buying a bass. And none of you are helping one bit. ;):p
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.