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micing vs. DI

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by elwuss, Mar 11, 2013.


  1. elwuss

    elwuss

    Feb 24, 2013
    Zagreb, Croatia
    finally got the new rig together:bassist:

    2wej429.


    I have a pedalboard with a couple of drives, fuzz, delay, looper... and never liked to DI it at gigs.

    everybody knows drive + DI = crap.

    is the micing the only way of doing it? because honestly I'm already tired of explaining it every time to the sound guy:rollno:

    maybe it's a silly question, but is it possible to put DI somewhere else in the chain so it doesn't mess up the sound?
     
  2. Erm, I put my pedal board straight into the PA all the time.

    You might like a low pass filter on your fuzziness to stop the sound guy panicking over blowing his tweeters.
     
  3. AuntieBeeb

    AuntieBeeb

    Dec 12, 2010
    London
    I'd be surprised if there's no DI out on the head. Is there an XLR socket on the back labelled 'DI out' or similar? It's usually a good compromise, as the amp can serve as a buffer for your pedalboard and it should still sound like "you" when sent to the FOH.
     
  4. Other than a mic the next best option is a DI with a speaker sim like the Tone Hammer or Palmer PD09.
     
  5. elwuss

    elwuss

    Feb 24, 2013
    Zagreb, Croatia
    there is DI out on the head.

    but I really don't like ANY adjustment to the sound coming from my cab.
    and that's what every DI does to me. :(
     
  6. ngh

    ngh

    Feb 6, 2013
    brooklyn, ny
    this topic has been beat to death on here. but i'll bite.

    Buy a mic (use the search function for recommendations on good mics) and a stand.
    bring them to every gig and just set it up yourself, be nice to the sound guy (this is the important part!!) and tell him you set up your mic and all he has to do is run it to the board. if he refuses explain (kindly and logically!) that in your experience your dirt box's come off harsh and unpleasant DI, and that you have found the mic to be a simple solution. if he still refuses, drop it and run DI. or don't thats up to you really.

    most venues won't have a bass cab mic or even an extra bass drum mic handy to run your rig through so just show up with all the kit you need and the sound guy can't complain.

    edit- I used to get alot of "well your head has a DI lets just use that" when I had a head with a DI on the back, I started just telling sound guys it was broken which tended to work fine in convincing them to let me mic it.
     
  7. ngh

    ngh

    Feb 6, 2013
    brooklyn, ny
    yes, directly in from the mic... :bag:
     
  8. father of fires

    father of fires Commercial User

    Nov 29, 2006
    BALTIMORE CITY
    Chief of Medicine at Damnation Audio
    This is the exact reason Sansamp Bass Drivers were invented. A bass driver at the end of your board to the mixer and the parallel out to your head. Not ideal if you love your tone but it'll work in a pinch.
     
  9. +1

    For me one of the biggest turning points was learning to get a sound I liked before my signal hit the cab. There are several points I can DI out on my rig depending on the iteration I have brought. They are all usable. You will run into the signal sent to the PA not sounding exactly like what is coming from your speaker if your speakers have a lot of their own coloration. For me I circumvented that by getting a cab that is tonally pretty close to a good FOH system.

    If you love/need the sound your cab provides, then you have to mic it. Its part of your signal chain, and the way to include it in the signal the FoH sees is with a mic.
     
  10. elwuss

    elwuss

    Feb 24, 2013
    Zagreb, Croatia
    ok, so basically what you're saying is there's no alternative to micing it.

    buying your own mic is a good idea.

    but I remember once a sound guy used a DI, but also miced the cab.
    so he used 2 signals. Don't know how, but it didn't mess up the sound. Unfortunately, I don't remember how exactly did he do it...

    btw, about your advice on "being nice to sound guy" - learned it. the hard way:ninja:
     
  11. elwuss

    elwuss

    Feb 24, 2013
    Zagreb, Croatia
    one more thing.

    90% of sound guys say they wan to DI it because it will lack the low end f they just mic it.

    But maybe it had something to do with my very middley bassman cab :D
     
  12. elwuss

    elwuss

    Feb 24, 2013
    Zagreb, Croatia
    I can agree on that.
    unfortunately, don't have a sansamp (yet).
     
  13. ngh

    ngh

    Feb 6, 2013
    brooklyn, ny
    I am not saying that there are no other options. in fact there are tons of different places in your chain to run your DI which all have their pros and cons. but as cl400peavy pointed out, if you want it to sound like your cab is in the signal chain than you need to mic it. and besides it is nice to have your own mic for your bass rig, makes home recording easier, and who doesnt need an extra paper weight? ;)
     
  14. elwuss

    elwuss

    Feb 24, 2013
    Zagreb, Croatia
    haha, I meant to say it IS a good idea to have your own mic. I don't know how this "NO" ended up there:D
     
  15. ngh

    ngh

    Feb 6, 2013
    brooklyn, ny
    it will lack low end if you have an sm57 micing it. but if you use a mic intended to reproduce the rumbly stuff than that is simply not the case
     
  16. I don't find that most DIs or cabinets with compression drivers play very nicely with distortion effects. A few of the speaker sim DIs do ok but for my money, they don't measure up to a microphone. Cabs without tweeters attenuate the very top end which is conducive to a pleasing distortion sound. This is why you almost never see a tweeter in a guitar cabinet.

    I will have 20 years experience mixing live sound this summer (man, I'm getting old) and if I'm working with a bassist that uses distortion, I get a mic ready (and a DI too if I have enough channels on the desk). I also tend to talk to the bands to get a sense of what they're looking for sonically and if they have any preferences for mics/DIs etc. It's too bad that many sound people don't do this.
     
  17. ngh

    ngh

    Feb 6, 2013
    brooklyn, ny
    amen
     
  18. In a lot of situations, close miking with a '57 actually works great even with its limited LF extension. Lots of times you don't need or want all that low end in the house, especially in a big boomy room.
     
  19. funnyfingers

    funnyfingers

    Nov 27, 2005
    Everyone is forgetting about DI vs micing vs micing with a preamp to add even more warmth, lol :)
     
  20. ngh

    ngh

    Feb 6, 2013
    brooklyn, ny
    or why not just mic the bass with a contact mic and forget all of that other millarky! :bag: ;)
     

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