Question regarding pedal manufacturer

Discussion in 'Effects [BG]' started by Smokeyharrisun, Jul 25, 2019.


  1. Smokeyharrisun

    Smokeyharrisun

    Jul 14, 2019
    Hey guys
    Probably a dumb question, but- I'm interested in buying a specific compression pedal but couldn't find any information regarding the compression amount. This information is important as this pedal is unavailable for me to test in person and I want to make sure the specs fit me well before I order it. I contacted the manufacturer asking for for the ratio/ threshold amount and functionality. The manufacture responded that this is not a traditional compressor so the meters aren't measured in a traditional way, therefore couldn't provide an answer. Obviously they don't want to reveal this information for some reason. Is it a common thing among pedal companies not to provide this info? Is it possible that they honestly cannot provide an answer to a question like what is the maximal compression ratio or can you control the threshold? Should I be suspicious because of it?
    What yall say?
    Thanks!
    P
     
  2. Adamixoye

    Adamixoye A PT Pro is cool for worship, right?

    Apr 9, 2012
    Occasional Beta Tester for Confusion Studios, Singular Sound, and Source Audio
    Would be a lot more interesting if you could specify the company and pedal. I'm assuming you didn't sign any sort of NDA.
     
  3. Smokeyharrisun

    Smokeyharrisun

    Jul 14, 2019
    Not at all, I just dont want to needlessly shame the manufacturer (and myself) in case I am completely wrong :)
     
  4. Adamixoye

    Adamixoye A PT Pro is cool for worship, right?

    Apr 9, 2012
    Occasional Beta Tester for Confusion Studios, Singular Sound, and Source Audio
    Well, your own inference is that the company is being deceptive. There is a pretty broad knowledge base on TB that could probably comment on if the pedal is unique and what the metering might mean, which would provide insight into whether or not the company's claim makes sense of if they are just being obtuse for some reason.
     
    stigbeve likes this.
  5. Stumbo

    Stumbo Guest

    Feb 11, 2008
    Shame someone on TB? Never! :roflmao:
     
  6. Buying a compressor based on specs may not be the best solution, I have never been sure until I could 'feel and hear' it in action. There are no agreed upon industry standards for comparison so even if the maker provided numbers they are meaningless without a standard of reference that does not exist.
     
  7. Clark Dark

    Clark Dark

    Mar 3, 2005
    earth
    no shame here...just forward this video to :20

     
  8. Adamixoye

    Adamixoye A PT Pro is cool for worship, right?

    Apr 9, 2012
    Occasional Beta Tester for Confusion Studios, Singular Sound, and Source Audio
    Your first point is a reasonable one but I don't know what you mean by "no...standards for comparison." Usually the metering indicates the level of gain reduction that has been triggered, that's a fairly objective thing.
     
  9. Lava

    Lava Supporting Member

    Jul 14, 2014
    El Paso, TX
    Someone on this forum may own the same pedal and give you much insight into it's specs and use. Don't ask for help if you don't want it.
     
  10. Like measuring watts and many other things there are no industry standards that end consumers can rely upon to base numerical comparisons on, certainly in a field as small and unique as effects pedal manufacturing there is no governing body to set reliable standards. The only way would be to have the pedals side by side in a lab setting.
     
    bongomania and thetragichero like this.
  11. Adamixoye

    Adamixoye A PT Pro is cool for worship, right?

    Apr 9, 2012
    Occasional Beta Tester for Confusion Studios, Singular Sound, and Source Audio
    Gain reduction in dB shouldn't require an industry standard
     
  12. DDXdesign

    DDXdesign formerly 'jammadave' Supporting Member Commercial User

    Oct 15, 2003
    Vegas
    OK you said that "The manufacture responded that this is not a traditional compressor so the meters aren't measured in a traditional way, therefore couldn't provide an answer."

    I have actually seen this mentioned before, though i can't remember which pedal. Could be something like a variable threshold and variable ratio based on input, so it's very difficult to pin down the numbers - I can't for the life of me remember which pedal I saw that about though, maybe the Doc Lloyd Photon Deathray? Maybe the Pigtronix Philosopher's Tone? Heavy Oppressor? Crap.

    My point is, that it may not be deception when they say they can't give the numbers - it may just be a result of how the pedal works.
     
    HolmeBass likes this.
  13. I don't mean to go all Mythbusters on you but in the real world there are too many variables for the numbers to have any but a relative meaning. Gain reduction would depend on input pitch, input gain, input level, input stress, input density and other factors not accounted for.
     
    bongomania, SLO Surfer and HolmeBass like this.
  14. nnnnnn

    nnnnnn

    Oct 27, 2018
    Australia
    I would have thought that even a non-traditional compressor must share at least some of the basic characteristics of other compressors, otherwise it isn't a compressor, it is something else.

    In any case surely the company can at least describe in non-technical terms what sort of effect the unit should have on your sound?

    Presumably the pedal has some knobs on it that control something. What does the company say the knobs do?
     
  15. JimmyM

    JimmyM

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Yamaha, Ampeg, Line 6, EMG
    What if it's something like a Dyna Comp? A 2 knob comp that has output and sensitivity knobs? How do you measure threshold and ratio on that?
     
    drumvsbass, mmbass21, Bolsyo and 3 others like this.
  16. 40Hz

    40Hz Supporting Member

    First up, welcome to TalkBass. Glad to see you join us. :)

    Regarding this mystery compressor…

    It’s very difficult to evaluate the credibility of an answer some manufacturer gave you without knowing the exact wording of your question(s) and the answer(s) you received.

    But the more important question is whether or not this compressor you're looking at will fit your requirements. So the more productive approach might be to just spell out precisely what your goal for a compressor is, and also tell us which compressor you’re thinking of getting. That would put everyone here in a better position to give you answers that would actually be helpful.
     
  17. Smokeyharrisun

    Smokeyharrisun

    Jul 14, 2019
    Thanks for the answer! My question was less about the specs and more about general common practice when it comes to pedal companies and the information they choose to disclose or not :) I wanted to hear if anyone has had same experience, genuinely just because I have no clue and found it interesting. already got great tips here regarding which pedal I should and shouldn't buy.
     
  18. Smokeyharrisun

    Smokeyharrisun

    Jul 14, 2019
    Comp knob- adds compression. Tried to ask for a approximation to how much gain reduction can be achieved (even a rough range) but couldn't get an answer... I don't have knowledge on how pedals are built and what is technically possible or not, but I did find somewhat odd that I couldn't a more elaborative answer.. again- could be 100% wrong that's why I'm asking here :)
     
  19. Smokeyharrisun

    Smokeyharrisun

    Jul 14, 2019
    Thanks!
     
  20. There is an independant website with compressor reviews which won't publish specs but will give a fair review. Check ovnilab.
     
    smeet likes this.
  21. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
    Jun 16, 2021

Share This Page