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Billy Sheehan

Discussion in 'Bassists [BG]' started by Venturella, Feb 6, 2018.


  1. tfer

    tfer

    Jan 1, 2014
    Vai has freely admitted that he let his ego get in his way in the past. By the time he joined Whitesnake, he was a self-admitted a-hole. He believed the hype, and became a less than stellar human being.

    He’s pulled himself above that now, using the lens that age and maturity provide a person with, and by all accounts, is now a great guy and teacher.

    That each of them is so willing to give back to the music community, is to be admired.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2018
    two fingers likes this.
  2. IamGroot

    IamGroot

    Jan 18, 2018
     
  3. IamGroot

    IamGroot

    Jan 18, 2018


    1st violinist sounds out of tune.
     
  4. IamGroot

    IamGroot

    Jan 18, 2018


    Live, Coltrane has reed problems in the beginning.
     
  5. IamGroot

    IamGroot

    Jan 18, 2018
     
  6. JKos

    JKos

    Oct 26, 2010
    Torrance, CA
    @IamGroot,
    What is your point/intent of posting the other videos? To denigrate Mr. Sheehan in some backhanded way? Is this an example of being deeply rooted in music theory getting in the way of simply enjoying music?

    - John
     
    tfer likes this.
  7. tfer

    tfer

    Jan 1, 2014
    I’m confused as well.

    If it’s an attempt to denigrate Sheehan, it’s a swing and a miss. The playing in their jam is superb.

    As is the playing in the other videos. Pointing out that Trane has a reed problem is laughable. That’s live music...
     
  8. IamGroot

    IamGroot

    Jan 18, 2018
    Just alternate takes on the same standard. Remember, I mentioned the parts of the jam I liked. Or did you not bother to read my post.
     
    FunkHead and tfer like this.
  9. IamGroot

    IamGroot

    Jan 18, 2018
    I guess you didnt bother to read all the threads or watch the opening minutes of the clip. Did you notice he played a few notes, adjusted the mothpiece and then went off camera. He had a bad reed. Happens to everyone. I guess you didnt pick up on it.
     
  10. tfer

    tfer

    Jan 1, 2014
    No, I didn’t.

    The unexpected is what I enjoy about live music. That ‘Trane would have that kind of stuff happen to him is nice to see. That it was never edited out, is even better.
     
  11. JKos

    JKos

    Oct 26, 2010
    Torrance, CA
    Yes, I had read your post. It just seemed like a veiled attempt to say that because Sheehan isn't steeped in music theory, he played something that you said didn't work. And then posting videos unrelated to Sheehan (yes, same song, I get that) as ways of saying, this is how it's done. That's just how I took it.

    - John
     
  12. IamGroot

    IamGroot

    Jan 18, 2018
    My Favorite Things is a jazz standard. Why don't you post the video over on the DB side and see what they think?
     
  13. JKos

    JKos

    Oct 26, 2010
    Torrance, CA
    Oh, they'd have a field day with it.

    @IamGroot, all good. What you meant isn't what I read. Such is human communication.

    Sorry to detract from this thread, everyone.

    - John
     
    tfer likes this.
  14. JKos

    JKos

    Oct 26, 2010
    Torrance, CA
    I had the privilege of attending Billy Sheehan's talk during Bass Player Live 2010. He talked about his bass, his equipment, how he does almost all his bass setup work (including fret leveling, etc.), and how he developed his playing techniques (referenced above about filling out a three piece and covering other parts of songs). Seemed like a really humble, nice, genuine guy.

    A funny from the talk... During almost the entire talk there was a terrible hiss emanating from his rig. Maybe 5 mins before his talk was over, he finally noticed it, stepped back to his rig, turned one knob (adjusted the noise gate), and the hiss stopped. I think there was a collective, unspoken sigh of relief from the crowd because it had been rather irritating. Apparently, he couldn't hear it.

    - John
     
    tfer likes this.
  15. tfer

    tfer

    Jan 1, 2014
  16. jdthebassman

    jdthebassman

    Jul 11, 2010
    don't tell jeff berlin that LOL
     
  17. Berlin is a big billy fan or at least he was at one point.
     
  18. tfer

    tfer

    Jan 1, 2014
    It’s a mutual admiration. Billy has stated many times that he’s a fan of Berlin.
     
  19. IamGroot

    IamGroot

    Jan 18, 2018
    tfer likes this.
  20. TuneSalad666

    TuneSalad666 Banned

    Mar 1, 2018
    Denmark
    Disclaimer: Well this got kind of messy and slightly repetitious and my conclusion kind of differ a little from some of the stuff I claim earlier in the post, but it's kind of late here and I am tired. Hope you'll get the point though.

    It doesn't really surprise me one bit.

    You don't learn about music by reading a music theory book, music needs to be experienced to be able to understand it.

    Music came first then theory was build on the experiences from playing.

    They didn't come up with music theory first and then went on with how to apply it to an instrument, they figured out what worked by playing, and then applied theory to find out why it worked and developed a whole system they then could use to communicate ideas on paper and be able to intellectually explain what actually happens.

    You know theoretically, and I am sure there are in fact players like that, you can have perfect pitch and be so much at home on your bass's fretboard from playing that you could play just about anything without even knowing the names of the notes.

    I am not saying you shouldn't learn theory, it's a great and very practical tool, especially when needing to communicate your ideas to other musicians, but actual experience by playing comes before reading about it in a book in my opinion.

    To come with an example by Victor Wooten, he compares it to learning language.

    When you first learn how to speak you do it by spectating and listening to others do it and then mimic them until you learn how to do it properly, you basically learn by jamming with others participating in conversation, even if your first attempts will be kind of primitive.

    Even with grammar you will already know most of it by experience by the time they teach it to you in school.

    As I said theory is a great supportive tool to lean against when in doubt, when you are learning something new, or having to communicate a musical idea to another musician, but for me it shouldn't be the primary objective when learning how to play an instrument.

    Playing is primary objective, theory is secondary.

    When that is said it will kind of depend on the individual and how they happen to learn best though, some prefer to learn by doing with a more intuitive approach to the leaning process, and some are more comfortable with understanding something intellectually first before they actually attempt to apply what they have learned to real life.

    Not everyone is wired the same way, some will be best off primarily learning by doing and some will be better off initially learning theory.

    For me personally learning theory first just seems kind of backwards.

    A bit like mapping out the route before you have decided where to go or something like that.

    40Hz explains much better than I do exactly what theory is good for: Billy Sheehan

    Not a finger to put on his actual play, perhaps except maybe for not baking off sometimes, 2 people shredding at the same time constantly on top of each other get's a little tedious to listen to in the long run, and damn the tone of his bass is highly inappropriate and straight out annoying in that context.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2018

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