Fingers getting caught

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by wishface, Aug 23, 2019.


  1. wishface

    wishface

    Jan 27, 2012
    Fingers getting caught

    The video should be working now. I didn't realise setting it private would be a problem.

    That's what I have been doing. The action as i have it seems fine. The strings don't seem out of whack in terms of height.
     
  2. wishface

    wishface

    Jan 27, 2012
    Of course, I imagine most of us do :D

    It's just our friend above was referring to having teh strings aligned relative to the curve of the fretboard.

    I have mine as low as I can stand it without fret buzz
     
  3. IMO, you just need to practice more with your new bass, i.e., get more familiar with it.
    Once you're familiar with it, you'll be fine and your fingers won't be caught anymore.

    I watched your youtube, and I think you need to practice at slower tempo.
     
    SLO Surfer and SteveCS like this.
  4. gebass6

    gebass6 We're not all trying to play the same music. Supporting Member

    Now that I can see the video,I see that your finger tips are digging too deep.
    Not by much.
    But enough that it slows you.

    A ramp MAY be a solution.
    Or you could try to play with your hand at a lower angle to the bass.
    Also play lightly on the finger tips.
     
  5. SteveCS

    SteveCS

    Nov 19, 2014
    Hampshire, UK
    It is working now.
    To be perfectly frank, I don't think your basic technique is yet ready for music at that tempo and the problem is not going to be solved with setup. I would consider my previous comments on L/R synchronisation, which I think were in a different thread. It's no good being able to move both hands at the same tempo - any tempo - if they don't move at the same time. I can hear lots of timing collisions going on, with not much clean pitch.
     
  6. wishface

    wishface

    Jan 27, 2012
    You're watching a video that was made quickly with ambient audio caught in the mic using a cheap webcam angled so as to demonstrate the problem in the moment. While I'm certainly not claiming to have the best technique this analysis I'm afraid isn't helpful. I can't demonstrate this problem because it isn't something that can be planned for. Respectfully, i feel you are greatly over analysing what you are hearing.
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2019
  7. SteveCS

    SteveCS

    Nov 19, 2014
    Hampshire, UK
    Actually, the occurence of mistakes and persistence of flaws can be planned for by refusing to recognise them and/or failing to address them. Until you realise this and start planning, i.e. by critical analysis, nothing will improve.
     
    SLO Surfer likes this.
  8. wishface

    wishface

    Jan 27, 2012
    And broadly I fully agree. You will get no argument from me that technique is important, but I feel you are arguing against a straw man. This issue isn't something that happens consciously; were that the case then the cause would be clear. I played busily in that clip precisly to invoke the problem. I could have just as easily recorded me playing just fine, there's no way to know. Are you suggesting this is related to my left hand and not my picking hand?

    Please note, this isn't a problem that has manifested until I started on my current bass (Sire M2). If technique were the cause, in the manner you seem to be suggesting, then it would have been a more persistent issue.

    On that basis, while I rule nothing out, I believe it to be the strings themselves. It could be due to the shape of the instrument/fretboard. But I don't know how we can divine that short of hoping I adapt.
     
  9. gebass6

    gebass6 We're not all trying to play the same music. Supporting Member

    I agree with SteveCS.

    Think about this.
    There are many bass players that can play an assortment of different basses with different setups and strings with few adjustment problems.

    Why?
    They are able to adapt to minor differences.
    Because their technique is flexible.
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2019
    SteveCS likes this.
  10. SteveCS

    SteveCS

    Nov 19, 2014
    Hampshire, UK
    OK, here's something I think I saw...
    On one of the descending lines I thought I saw your index finger collide with your thumb, which was still anchored on the string I thought you were trying to play. On closer examination, you actually completely miss the intended B on the D string and your finger bounces off the A string with no note sounded. It's somewhere around the 7s mark...
     
  11. I see the video now, and like others, to answer your question of what’s happening; It’s your technique.

    1.) you are attacking the string with your right hand plucking fingers from too far away from the string. You’re striking them, rather than plucking them.

    2.) this technique (striking) can be effective IF you are used to the string spacing.

    The video looks, to me, like you are attacking from too far away, and your fingers are used to hitting the strings further apart.

    Try putting the strings you know you like, like the exact strings, take them off the bass you’re comfy on, and put them on this new bass.
     
  12. Stumbo

    Stumbo Guest

    Feb 11, 2008
    With your thumb resting on the string about where you are playing, not only do you have to time the movement of your fingers, you have to time the movement and placement of your thumb.
     
  13. wishface

    wishface

    Jan 27, 2012
    I'm not sure I get your point
     
  14. wishface

    wishface

    Jan 27, 2012
    What do you mean by 'striking'? I have never heard this term before in the context of bass guitar playing.

    How can you gauge distance from that camera angle? How close should the fingers be?

    I'm baffled by this analysis, I must say
     
  15. wishface

    wishface

    Jan 27, 2012
    Of course, but that has never been a problem for me. My thumb has never slowed me down before. The issue comes when I make contact with the finger, not the thumb, onto the string. Like the string is dry and "graspy" (so to speak) and thus hard to negotiate. Not smooth. I can't describe it any better.
     
  16. Stumbo

    Stumbo Guest

    Feb 11, 2008
    Have you tried flat wound strings?

    Maybe try a tiny bit of talcum powder on your fingers?

    Or rub in some hand lotion before you play.

    Get your fingers moisturized.
     
  17. wishface

    wishface

    Jan 27, 2012
    No, I don't really have the money for new strings at the moment and flats are not cheap. I'd happily try a set though. It may be just the ticket.

    Perhaps it's just a question of adaptation then. Fortuantely I enjoy practising so hopefully in time these difficulties will be overcome, it's hjust tremendously disconcerting. I wonder if adaptation is possible?
     
  18. 7427B461-F569-48AD-B10F-34207C85AAF4.png
    Baffled? Plenty on here (and out there) about striking vs plucking strings in regards to bass technique. I recommend looking it up and trying it.

    Your attack is clearly starting from about an inch or more away from the strings in your video. Looks like a boxer swinging out of control windmill arms rather than one throwing short and concise jabs. Here’s a shot of you coming down on the G-string with your pointer finger, for example.

    If you’re still baffled, try my other analysis and switch the strings you own and like from your old bass to your new bass. Quick and easy way to rule out the strings.

    You also haven’t answered the questions whether your new bass bridge may have closer string spacing than your old bass bridge.

    How many basses have you tried in your life? The more you play, the more adaptable your technique can become.
     
    gebass6 likes this.
  19. SteveCS

    SteveCS

    Nov 19, 2014
    Hampshire, UK
    Just a selection of your replies tells me you aren't interested in the truth or in any real help or support being offered by people. I don't know what you expect people to say. Every time a valid point is made you dismiss it, but you accept suggestions that the problem will be fixed with moisturiser or talcum powder... It won't.

    The technique demonstrated in that video - which is all we have to go on - is ragged, frenzied and imprecise with huge variations in timing of both hands, no control over dynamics and poor articulation of notes. You need to slow down and get things under control in a repeatable deliberate manner. Your ability to play at higher tempo will then come naturally.

    If, as you suggest, you deliberately played that way to force the mistake, then the solution is easy - play as you otherwise would have done.

    Apologies if this is not what you wanted to hear, I'm just saying what I think others are thinking.
     
    SLO Surfer and gebass6 like this.
  20. wishface

    wishface

    Jan 27, 2012
    I forgot I was asked for string measurements, my apologies. Both basses are about 14/16 of an inch. It's a little hard to read using my tape measure. The old bass may be acouple of /16ths different
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2019
  21. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
    Sep 21, 2021

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